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When i open my raw files in adobe photoshop, a message box opens asks:

the document has an embedded color profile that does not match the current RGB working space.

Embedded: Adobe RGB (1998)

Working: Monitor RGB - sRGB IEC61966-2.1

What would you like to do?

  • Use the embedded profile (instaed of working space)
  • Convert document's colors to the working space
  • Discard the embedded profile (don't color manage)

What does each option mean exactly or what should i choose normally to get best for editing and final printing results?

I have 2 options in my nikon camera: sRGB(current) and Adobe-RGB. Can you please explain shortly, which option shall be used in photoshop (and/or ACR) to get best results in printing? How to set defaults such that it doesn't ask such message each time i open a raw picture.

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When you open a raw file in PS, it first gets presented in ACR. There, you can set the colour space you want to assign to the demosaiced image. Adobe RGB is a good default, you might think about changing it to ProPhoto, as long as you work in 16 bit mode in PS. You can also select sRGB there already.

sRGB is the smallest of the three, followed by Adobe and ProPhoto. Working in a wider color space means you have more extreme colours available. But for final output, you may have to convert it down, as most output devices can't cope with those wide spaces! For web use, sRGB is generally still recommended, as a common denominator.

When you then continue to PS, where your working space is evidently configured to be sRGB, you can either

  • convert the image down to the working space.

    This would be a suboptimal solution. If you want to restrict your image to sRGB in edit, do so already in ACR, as stated before.

  • use the embedded space.

    This in effect means to ignore the default of PS and switch the working space to Adobe RGB for this image.

  • discard (ignore) the embedded profile.

    This is the worst, and probably wrong option. Your image will be represented with wrong colours, not at all like you painstakingly finetuned it in ACR!

So, in summary, work in the same color space you produced from ACR, and mind the final space when you save as eg. JPEG.

For printing, the final step is usually soft-proofing, where you display the image converted to the color profile of your printer and adjust it so it looks as good as possible under its restrictions.

  • Thanks for your answer. I have 2 options in my nikon camera: sRGB(current) and Adobe-RGB. Can you please explain shortly, which option shall be used in photoshop (and/or ACR) to get best results in printing? I want to set defaults such that it doesn't ask such message each time i open a raw picture. – S.Serpooshan Sep 21 '17 at 18:33
  • I see some options in Edit > Color Setings menu, what should be set for RGB, CMYK, ... dropdowns? – S.Serpooshan Sep 21 '17 at 18:43
  • What you set in camera is irrelevant for raw. In acr and ps, set the same rgb profile. sRGB ist the easiest, but Adobe RGB might be better if your output device can support mire than srgb. but it's up to you. cmyk is irrelevant. – ths Sep 21 '17 at 19:02
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    This is 'true' but kind of misses the point. You should never set your working space to your monitor profile, you should set it to your working space... which is this case would be Adobe 98. Perform any profile recalculation once & once only, at export - keeping your original file always at the original profile. Your monitor profile is always automatically taken into consideration at display, you never want it in your actual workflow. – Tetsujin Sep 21 '17 at 19:37
  • @Tetsujin I want to set defaults such that it doesn't ask such message each time i open a raw picture. So: 1) shall i choose sRG or AdobeRGB in my camera, 2) What to set in photoshop menu Edit > Color Setings > RGB option? 3) in ACR plugin when i open a raw file (i don't know where is its options but there is a link in bottom of screen which says color profile and it seems to remember the choice for next file) – S.Serpooshan Sep 23 '17 at 6:51

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