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In the past, when I have gotten a new camera, I have just done a black test, or what some call a "cap test". You equip a lens, put on the lens cap, then take a series of exposures at the full range of possible ISOs in raw. The resulting images will reveal any bad pixels or glaring sensor problems. Fine.

However, I just got new OM-D M1 II which for me is a fairly pricey camera, so I would like to do more testing than just a black test to make sure it is ok. What tests should I do?

  • Did you buy it new? – AthomSfere Aug 25 '17 at 1:10
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    Try using it to take photos. I know of no better way to test a camera. When in doubt check the manual, if yours doesn't do what the manual says it should, then you have a problem. Until then, assume it works. – StephenG Aug 25 '17 at 2:35
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I have had some cameras with lens uniformity problems, where some areas in their photos were not as sharp as other areas. Most of the time the corners weren't as sharp as the center of the image, but occasionally a camera took photos where the center was blurrier than the rest of the image.

To test the lens uniformity, I printed out several pieces of paper with letters on them at various font sizes. Then I posted them on a wall and took a photo of them. It's easier to judge the sharpness in a photo that's showing text rather than scenery.

Here's an example:

enter image description here

When performing this test, blurriness in the photo could also be the result of a misaligned lens mount, as Michael Clark indicates in a comment:

Such a test will also reveal alignment issues that could be caused by the camera's mounting flange being out of square with the camera's sensor. For cameras with in-body stabilization (where the sensor moves on several axes) this can be a common problem.

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    This seems like a lens test more than a camera test... – AthomSfere Aug 25 '17 at 1:09
  • Interesting test, but this is for lenses, not digital cameras. – Clickety Ricket Aug 25 '17 at 2:37
  • @TylerDurden For non-DSLR cameras though, the lens is a part of the camera. – pacoverflow Aug 25 '17 at 2:41
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    Such a test will also reveal alignment issues that could be caused by the camera's mounting flange being out of square with the camera's sensor. For cameras with in-body stabilization (where the sensor moves on several axes) this can be a common problem. – Michael C Aug 25 '17 at 5:11
  • @pacoverflow, mirrorless cameras (as mention by OP) is not DSLR, but it have interchangeable lenses. – Romeo Ninov Aug 25 '17 at 6:00

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