1

Beforehand I have no experience in photography, I just found the camera on the basement and tried it, so sorry for possible terminology errors.

I shot recently a few pictures with the following camera and film:

  • Canon AE-1 + 50mm lense
  • Kodak 200 color print film

I bought a C-41 development kit, and developed the negatives according to several tutorials. I noticed that when I scanned the negatives that all my pictures had a greenish tone.

Did something went wrong during the development process or did I use the wrong settings (like wrong shutter speed etc.)?

Example of a image inside

Example of a image outside

  • 1
    I won't lie, i know nothing about film, but it does look like over exposure. – schnipdip Jul 12 '17 at 18:43
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    Was this film you used found in the camera? Looks like old film combined with underexposure, along with scanning too green/yellow. – digijim Jul 12 '17 at 19:16
  • Thanks guys,I'll try different settings on the next film. – weletonne Jul 12 '17 at 19:49
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    Someone's going to link to this question and ask what Instagram filter was used in 3...2...1... – Caleb Jul 12 '17 at 20:16
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    Possible duplicate of Green Fog in Negative Scan – mattdm Jul 21 '17 at 21:50
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Most likely your film is perfectly fine. What is not correct is the way is the way it was digitized and made into a positive image.

Color Film has an orange mask, If you just digitize the image and invert it it will look like the images you show. You need to do proper interpretation of the digitized data discarding the information of the base orange layer and then do color balancing for the image.

enter image description here

enter image description here

For a more detailed explanation read: https://photo.stackexchange.com/a/91123/39557

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In my personal experience, this is most likely due to scanning. Color film has it's own base color that needs to compensated for. This can be done in the scanner by changing the hue of the scanning light to counter-act the film tint. If you cannot change the scanning color you can compensate in software by using the tint (green/magenta) slider. Bring it more to the magenta side and you might see the green tint go away.

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    It is important to understand that you don't need to counter-act the green, you need to get rid of the information for the orange layer on the negative completely, it shouldn't be part of the image. Otherwise your black levels will be skewed. See: photo.stackexchange.com/questions/76707/… – user39557 Jul 21 '17 at 21:58
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We are a film developing lab. Every once in a while, we develop a roll of film that has a green cast to it. It is either old film or film that was subjected to heat.

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It could be:

  • Old, expired film. Particularly if the film was not stored in a cool, stable temperature environment.
  • Old or improperly stored developing chemicals.
  • Improper temperatures during development. The C-41 process is extremely sensitive to temperature variations. If the chemicals are not properly heated and stable the colors will not be properly balanced.
  • Incorrect compensation for the color of the film substrate during scanning. Different films have different colors. When inverting the colors of a negative the orange cast of the film itself (rather than the color layers on top of it) will transform to green.
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    The film is new bought, the chemicals also and I store them in non-transparent containers. I tried my best to hold the proper temperature while developing. Maybe I try the last point and scan again with other settings. Thank you for your advice. – weletonne Jul 12 '17 at 19:48
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    Including that information in the question would have been most helpful... – Michael C Jul 12 '17 at 21:20
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    If you can eliminate the first three, then the last one is the most likely cause. – Michael C Jul 12 '17 at 21:36

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