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Even some good compact cameras at around $400 range cannot take a 4K and slow motion, so does an iPhone with small sensor that is generally prone to noise shooting 4K now?

A small sensor should always lag behind from what I have seen in terms of noise and low light capabilities.

Some people are even comparing it with DSLR cameras with ACPS and full frame sensors. How does this all make sense?

closed as off-topic by StephenG, Philip Kendall, scottbb, mattdm, Itai Jul 1 '17 at 18:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question is about video in a context that is not likely to be relevant to still photography." – StephenG, Philip Kendall, scottbb, mattdm, Itai
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    This sounds very much like a rant... What exactly is your question? – fkraiem Jul 1 '17 at 12:18
  • I think this is a good question. Now that it has been asked I would like to know the answer as well? How do iPhones take 4K slowmo? Is it software? My DSLR can't do this and probably has a nicer sensor and has much nicer lenses. – 10 Replies Jul 1 '17 at 12:33
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    cameras that cannot record 4K video in 2017 are not "good". they are outdated :-) – szulat Jul 1 '17 at 13:01
  • Videographers who want to use cameras designed to primarily be still cameras as camcorders are not rational. They are hopeless dreamers. – Michael C Jul 1 '17 at 13:36
  • So exactly how much does an iPhone 7 really cost compared to that $400 compact camera? That is, how much does it cost when the 24 month service contract is factored into the cost (or when you buy one at full price without a service contract if you can even do that any more)? – Michael C Jul 1 '17 at 13:38
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'4K' is a resolution, and doesn't say anything about quality or noise. 4K is 3840 pixels × 2160 lines = 8.3 megapixels; this is also nothing special in nowadays cameras.

The feat is to take 30 frames per seconds, and process them fast enough - and that is what the iPhone can impress with; it has a pretty fast processor (and fast enough memory).

Most DSLR are optimized for photo taking and processing, under much higher resolution, with higher dynamic range, and using a lot less light. Making a 20 MP camera process 8.3 MP of it into a video takes even more computing power than reading it from a 8.3 MP sensor, and cameras don't have such processors, also the writing on the usual SD cards is by far not as fast as internal memory in the iPhone.

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