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I planning to buy a Speedlite for my camera Nikon D90. I want a speedlite that can be triggered remotely using wireless, as well as mounted on camera. Can someone help me on what all I need to buy? The speedlite, something to trigger the speedlite remotely, some sort of mount for the speedlite — and anything else?

  • Sounds like you have figured out the basics that you need (speedlite, something to trigger the speedlite remotely, and mount for the speedlite). Are you looking for specific suggestions for particular models of those things to buy? If so, please understand that shopping questions are off-topic here at Photo.SE. – scottbb Apr 24 '17 at 12:06
  • Thank you. I am not looking for specific model. I wanted to know if there is any other part I am missing. – Shashi Apr 24 '17 at 13:48
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    As it stands this question is way too broad. Any definitive answer that covers everything you might have missed would be book length. While we don't do product recommendations ("What should I buy?"), we do have plenty of questions that go along the lines of "I'm thinking of using flash x with camera y. Will using trigger z allow me to fire/remotely set power and zoom manually/use TTL/use HSS/use second curtain sync/use FEC-FEB?" – Michael C Apr 24 '17 at 16:42
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There are only a few possible ways to trigger a remote flash. And only a speedlight will have the foot to mount on camera in the hot shoe.

Maybe see http://www.scantips.com/lights/flashguide.html

  1. Your D90 has a Commander in its internal flash that supports Nikons wireless method. Several Nikon flashes can do this, SB-700, SB-900, older SB-800 and SB-600. A very few other cases can do this too, like Yongnuo YN-565EX. This method includes TTL flash mode, and works pretty well indoors, less so outdoors. It uses infrared signaling, and requires clear line of sight between camera and flash.

  2. Radio triggers will work, attach a transmitter on camera hot shoe and receiver on flash foot. This pretty much works anywhere. It will generally be manual flash mode only, but there are alternates.

  3. Optical slave. Some speedlights build one in, some require adding an inexpensive attachment to the flash foot. This is manual flash mode, and are triggered in sync by seeing any other manual flash, like for example, the cameras internal flash can be a trigger.

  4. PC sync cords are old standby, a cable from camera to flash. For cameras without PC connector, and for flashes without PC connector, adapters can be added to provide it.

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    Radio triggers car be TTL compatible or manual only. Manual will work on any camera brand, whereas TTL has to be compatible with the proprietary protocol/wiring. The difference is the price. – Aurélien Pierre Apr 25 '17 at 2:21
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I want a speedlite that can be triggered remotely using wireless, as well as mounted on camera.

Any speedlight with an ISO-compliant foot and a sync voltage between 0-250V will fire in sync on a Nikon dSLR hotshoe, and can be triggered remotely with hotshoe-fitted radio triggers. However, if you want more advanced capabilities, like HSS/FP or iTTL, etc. you will need a flash that is Nikon-compatible, and that has the correct pin configuration on its foot to match the contacts on your camera's hotshoe. (See: Are Yongnuo flashes interchangeable between dslr's or are they brand specific?).

If you want to use CLS, you need a flash that has a CLS slave sensor in it. If you want "dumb" optical slaving, you need a flash that has that built-in, or has a way to attach that type of optical slave (PC sync port, flash foot).

See also: What features should one look for when selecting a flash?

Can someone help me on what all I need to buy? The speedlite, something to trigger the speedlite remotely, some sort of mount for the speedlite — and anything else?

Most typically, a one-light Strobist setup includes the following:

  • Speedlight
  • Light stand
  • Umbrella swivel/adapter (to attach the flash to the light stand)
  • Radio trigger (transmitter on the camera; receiver on the flash)
  • Modifer (umbrella, softbox, whatever), optional

The modifier is optional, but the light will typically be hard light without it, unless you're bouncing the flash.

Radio triggers are the most common form of wireless flash triggering used, because they don't have the line-of-sight requirements that optical triggering typically does.

Keep in mind that radio triggers, like optical systems and sync cables, also come in manual-only and TTL/HSS/remote-power control flavors. The more features the triggers have, the more expensive they're liable to be, but also the more convenient. (See also: What should I look for in a wireless flash trigger for a home studio?).

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