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I need to record videos at least 1080p (mainly video-lectures or like) averagely 5-15 hours every week..

I am not going to send those videos to Oscar's jury, but if possible, I need an normal/good HD quality for an affordable price (below 1000$). I was thinking to buy a camera (lets say, Canon SX50 HS) for that, but someone told me, that it's not advised to use a camera for frequent video-recording purposes, instead use VideoCamera.

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So, my questions: a) while recording with PhotoCamera, and try zooming, it has a sound, right?
b) I need it to record audio as well, good quality (I can use separate transmitter as mic-source).
c) is there a really huge concern, which one I use for recording videos? Will a Canon camera work well or do I have to buy a "Video Camera"?

What are the pros and cons? (p.s. I dont care if they record in 30 minute steps or etc..)

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3 Answers 3

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It is all about multi tools. You can buy smartphone which is capable of taking good pictures and good vodeos all in small body.

If you buy Canon EOS 1D you will get DSLR with capabilities of taking videos and it will outperform any nowadays smartphone in terms of image quality, possibilities and ergonomy. You will lose the device's capability to call your mom.

If you buy Hasselblad H5D you will get awesome camera that will outperform the Canon in studio photography. But you wil lose the video option and action photography capability.
If you buy Panasonic HC-X1000 camcorder, it will outperform the Canon and it will have better ergonomy for video, but you lose the ability to shoot stills.
If you choose GoPro, you will lose ergonomy and control over the image quality, but you will be able to shoot almost anywhere, even in liquid nitrogen.

If you are new, and I suppose you are, in video and photography, your gear is not the limitting factor yet. Try entry-level DSLR (Canon 1200D/Rebel T5) with capability of HD video and/or mirrorless camera with HD capability and try them and experiment. As a bonus, you will get good camera for a stills.

If you want to go more photographer's path, you can upgrade to fullframe; if you wan to go video you can upgrade to dedicated camcorder. GoPro, iON, Sony HDR, etc. are good to start with action/outdoor videos.

My advice: Try as many options you can and then pick the best one (in terms I want/I need/I can afford). Then never look back and don't regret anything.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you so much. some questions: Does a PhotoCameras have sound while zooming (during recording a video) , right? also, which VideoRecorder you can advise to me (1080p at least) in 500$-1000$? \$\endgroup\$
    – T.Todua
    Mar 28, 2017 at 18:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ I would recommend an entry-level mirrorless rather than a DSLR ;) \$\endgroup\$ Mar 28, 2017 at 19:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @AustinHenley I've added your comment in the answer. I am used to shoot via viewfinder and mirrorless lacks it. Mirrorless cameras have sligtly different ergonomy than DSLRs; neither better neither worse, just different. \$\endgroup\$
    – Crowley
    Mar 29, 2017 at 8:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ @T.Todua I won't recommend you any camcorder nor camera. Find several cameras in your range, try them and pick one. I know a lot of people that had gone to the shop for a perticular Nikon and they returned with a Canon. And vice versa. It is the ergonomy and handling philosophy that really matters; Sensitivity, resolution, speed, "wonderful bokeh" etc. are simillar among brands now. One year Nikon is The Best TM, second one it's Canon, another yoar Sony... \$\endgroup\$
    – Crowley
    Mar 29, 2017 at 9:04
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I'm going to take a different tact with my answer - its all about laws and the length of the video you are taking.

While DSLRs are capable of taking video, they are limited in the length of time that a single shot can take, typically around 30 minutes. This restriction is dictated by camera manufacturers trying to avoid import tariffs in the EU which arbitrarily kick in after 30 minutes of video recording - at which point the device changes classification from Still Camera to Video Camera (not sure of the actual classifications, but you get the idea).

Thus if you can keep single takes below 30 minutes then you can use a DSLR. But if you need to record continuously for more than 30 minutes (which may be the case with a lecture) you will have to use a video camera.

See Why is there a limit restriction to the 1080p film video recording time duration on DSLRs? for more details.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I dont care about time-limits, I care quality and stability of it. \$\endgroup\$
    – T.Todua
    Mar 28, 2017 at 18:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ also, PhotoCameras have sound while zooming (during recording a video) , right? \$\endgroup\$
    – T.Todua
    Mar 28, 2017 at 18:57
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Modern cameras often produce HD or better video quality, while allowing the use of various lenses.

You need to become clear what level of quality you want, but aside from audio, there is little that a dedicated video camera can offer in addition.

I recommend you either try a HD video with your photo camera, or if you don't have one, check on youtube for a video done with a photo camera.

Cell phones are typically a quality level below; they just don't have the processing power and size to house a chip that can process HD video.

Regarding what 'someone' says: either he needs to qualify his statement, or it's just balooney. Why 'shouldn't you' do it??

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I need a normal/good quality, 1080p... \$\endgroup\$
    – T.Todua
    Mar 28, 2017 at 18:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ HD is already 1920x1080. So most every camera is good enough for you. \$\endgroup\$
    – Aganju
    Mar 28, 2017 at 19:34

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