0
\$\begingroup\$

Anyone Know about compatibility of Canon EOS 5D Mark IV or Canon 5Ds R with Epic Pro V (GigaPan)?

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ What makes you think those two cameras would have any compatibility issues with the Epic Pro V? \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Commented Mar 17, 2017 at 12:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ I checked here gigapan.com/cms/support/camera-compatibility & didn't find both cameras. \$\endgroup\$
    – pawad
    Commented Mar 17, 2017 at 12:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ The list appears to have not been edited since sometime around the end of 2012. No models from Canon or Nikon (or probably any of the others, but who has time to check the release dates of every maker's lineup?) released since 2012 are listed. Current Canon models use the same wired release cables as the pre-2013 models that are listed. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Commented Mar 18, 2017 at 2:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ The copyright notice at the bottom of the compatibility page is dated 2013... \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Commented Mar 18, 2017 at 2:23

1 Answer 1

1
\$\begingroup\$

The only thing that differentiates pretty much any camera with a wired remote shutter release port from any other camera with a wired remote shutter release port is the shape of the connector. They're pretty much all incredibly simple. A ground wire and two wires that only need to complete a circuit.¹ Each wire is 1-bit. It's either on or off. There is no data communication going on. When the "half press" circuit is closed the camera behaves exactly as if the shutter button has been physically half pressed. When the "Full press" circuit is closed the camera behaves exactly as if the shutter button has been physically pressed all the way down.

The only thing you need to use the Epic Pro V with the EOS 5D Mark IV or EOS 5Ds R is a connecting cable with a Canon N3 connector to plug into the N3 port on the camera. This would be the same exact cable used for any of the Canon cameras with an N3 connector listed at the Gigapan camera compatibility page which doesn't appear to have had any models from any manufacturer listed that were introduced more recently than late 2012.

Using the Epic Pro V to control the shutter of any camera with a wired remote port is the same as using any wired remote intervalometer to control a camera. You can set the exposure times with the camera's controls for shutter times less than the camera's maximum shutter time (usually 30 seconds). The wired remote need only complete the "Shutter press" long enough to trigger an exposure. For shutter times longer than that you set the camera shutter time to "Bulb" and let the wired connection hold the shutter open for the desired length of time.

For a fuller discussion regarding the universilty of wired shutter release remotes, please this answer and comments to: Is there a good remote timer compatible with most Nikon and Canon (and Pentax and Sony) cameras?

¹Panasonic and some recent Fuji cameras do use a single wire plus ground to signal both a half and full press by placing resistors of different values in the circuit depending on the switch position. Everything you ever wanted to know about remote cable release connections: doc-diy.net/photo/remote_pinout

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.