7

Recently, I saw a blog post by Julia Trotti and I wonder how to achieve the same effect with Fujifilm X100T.

The effect can be seen in this photo. The landscape is in focus while object is blurry. When I take a picture with Fujifilm X100T with similar settings like this photo (aperture - f/3.5) camera is focused on object instead of background and background becomes blurry.

enter image description here

  • 7
    Your camera probably has several focusing modes, including one that lets you manually choose the focusing point. See the manual. – fkraiem Feb 4 '17 at 20:02
  • There's nothing inherently magical about the f/3.5 aperture - that's on a 50mm lens on a full-frame camera. To get a similar amount of blur, you'll probably want to use your lens wide open. – junkyardsparkle Feb 4 '17 at 21:22
  • Happens to me all the time :( – Alexander von Wernherr Aug 3 '18 at 13:25
20

There are (at least) four ways to do this:

  1. Use manual focus: This is (one of the reasons) why good cameras still have that feature. For this specific scene, there are other ways to achieve equivalent results, but there are situations (such as trying to shoot wildlife photos with grass or tree branches in the foreground) where manual focus is pretty much the only thing that works.

  2. Focus and recompose: As MikeW's answer describes in more detail, most cameras have some way to lock the focus distance before taking a photo, e.g. by pressing the shutter button halfway down, or by using a separate "AF lock" button. Thus, you can point your camera off to one side of the foreground subject, focus on the background, lock the focus and turn the camera back towards the foreground subject. If your camera has an AF/MF switch (as the X100T appears to have), you can also switch to manual focus mode after letting the autofocus do its job, and the camera should hold the focus unless you change it.

  3. Focus and restage: As a variant of the focus-and-recompose technique, for this particular image you could simply compose the background as you want without the model in it, lock focus, and then ask the model to step into the frame. Of course, this will only work if you can get the foreground subject to enter the frame when you want them to, e.g. because they're a person, or because it's a small object that you can hold in your hand and push into the frame yourself.

  4. Change the focusing point: Most modern autofocus cameras have multiple focusing points spread around the image area, and will allow you to choose which point to focus on, as well as between several ways to balance between multiple points. So, for a picture like this, just set you camera to point focus (i.e. only focus on a single point) and pick one of the points near the edge of the image area, outside the foreground subject. The camera will then autofocus on whatever is located at that spot, i.e. the background. This method can work even on something like a cheap cellphone camera with no AF lock or manual focus, as long as the phone lets you click on the preview screen to pick the focusing point (like my Android phone does, at least).

Any of these methods should work with your camera; the choice between them comes down to personal taste and situational convenience. If you're only taking a single quick shot, focus-and-recompose may be the fastest way to achieve what you want, without having to fiddle with camera settings or with manual focus. If you're taking multiple shots, and don't want to keep awkwardly swinging your camera off to one side before each shot, either use one of the other methods, or use focus-and-recompose but lock the focus using the MF/AF switch.

22

One way is to simply use manual focus. Since the landscape is very distant, there is only one thing to focus on once, then you frame and shoot multiple pictures as you like.

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You need to use the exposure lock feature of the camera and a technique called focus/recompose:

  • point the camera at the background
  • half-press the shutter button to lock focus
  • continuing to hold the shutter button halfway down, point the camera back at your subject
  • press the shutter button all the way down to take the shot

You can configure the camera to lock focus (or exposure) in a variety of ways, including "back-button focus" using the AEL/AFL button (start by reading further down in the above link for your manual).

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    You can also just flip the lens to manual once you've found your focus – Raystafarian Feb 6 '17 at 0:09
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I always like to use:

Use manual focus: This is (one of the reasons) why good cameras still have that feature. For this specific scene, there are other ways to achieve equivalent results, but there are situations (such as trying to shoot wildlife photos with grass or tree branches in the foreground) where manual focus is pretty much the only thing that works.

But, if you are using a phone that is easier. Just tap on the area and it focuses automatically.

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