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My Samsung WB250F camera can wirelessly transfer photos to a smartphone or a tablet via WiFi Direct. But, though I'm not sure if it's just natural, the transferring seems way too slow to me. It also has a WiFi tethered shooting feature and when I use that feature it infuriates me: it takes about 6 seconds to transfer the photo to my Samsung Galaxy S3 phone before the next photo is snapped.

What's causing the slow tethered shooting process, and is there something that I can do to overcome this issue?

  • Have you checked the average file size? – Shubhamoy Dec 29 '16 at 17:58
  • An image is about 5MBs – user152435 Dec 29 '16 at 18:00
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    I feel that's pretty normal. Try to click a blank photo and then try to transfer it. This way you would be able to conclude. – Shubhamoy Dec 29 '16 at 18:02
  • So tethered shooting via WiFi (with a phone) isn't fast like USB? – user152435 Dec 29 '16 at 18:12
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Wi-Fi is slow; non-infrastructure Wi-Fi doubly so. Most devices don't support IBSS (ad-hoc) networking in 802.11n or 802.11ac mode because being a base station requires multiple antennas in those modes. As a result, if you're tethering over Wi-Fi, you're probably limited to 802.11g speeds (54 Mbps over short distances, slower over longer distances).

With that said, if your numbers are accurate, it should not be that slow. Even over ad-hoc Wi-Fi, in 6 seconds, a camera should be able to transfer a 30-50 MB image. If it takes that long to transfer a 5 MB image, that's only about 833 kbps, which is appallingly slow even by 802.11b standards.

Technically, the minimum speed for 802.11a/b/g/n is 1 Mbps (typically at ~150 feet or so), so if you're getting less than that, you're either getting horrendous packet loss at the very fringes of the radio's range or:

  • The software is badly written
  • The camera doesn't start transmitting image data until after it finishes writing the photo to the flash card
  • Your cell phone is slow
  • Some combination of the above

You might try changing Wi-Fi channels if your camera allows you to do so, just in case it is an interference problem. But otherwise, such poor performance is likely indicative of a design flaw in Samsung's software/firmware, and there's not much you can do about it except complain until they fix it.

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