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My (UK) company wants me to take some photos of identifiable individuals in a private space, so they can be used on their commercial web site. Is a model release needed here?

I'm under the impression that it is, due to both the private environment and the commercial use. I understand that they will own the copyright to the photo, and therefore may be liable for said release.

Edit: Perhaps the main worry is if someone has their photo taken, moves to another company, and then wishes for it to be taken down. In that instance I'm not sure the company has much recourse.

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No. Model releases aren't used much in the UK.and there's no legal requirement for one.

However you may want to have a contract drawn out between you and the organisation to protect everyone involved's interests and probably a licensing agreements also (detailing usage and what each party is entitled to do).

However usual stack disclaimer. I'm not a solicitor, if in doubt speak to one.

  • I've added a comment to the original post: Perhaps the main worry is if someone has their photo taken, moves to another company, and then wishes for it to be taken down. In that instance I'm not sure the company has much recourse. (Perhaps, then, it might be in everyone's interests to use one anyway?) – Dan Nov 14 '16 at 16:03
  • Your opening line surprises me. I don't work in photography, but I do work in film/TV & i've never known us not get releases for anyone in front of a camera. [It's not a job I handle, but I've seen it being applied.] – Tetsujin Nov 14 '16 at 16:24
  • The subject of a photo has no rights compared to say the US so they don't get a say in how their image is used. liable laws withstanding I expect. If you expect there will be trouble, then a model release could just ease any tension in say the example you give. – Crazy Dino Nov 14 '16 at 18:23

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