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As you can see, the photo is very blurred. I tried playing with the manual settings, but I didn't get too promising results. What do you think the problem can be?

My settings:

ISO100, no zoom, exposition time: 1/550s, F-stop: F/7.4, image dpi: 72x72, image resolution: 12MP, no special effects.

I thought that perhaps there is not enough light, but this photo was taken in moderate sunlight and the problem is the same. Here, the difference in the settings: F/3.2, exposition time: 1/420s.

This is my first bridge camera and I am disappointed, that my previous Samsung WB350 compact camera shot sharper images.

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    Just a shot in the dark: what about trying shooting at native resolution, instead of the 12MP? – motoDrizzt Jun 18 '16 at 16:17
  • Perhaps at this lightness level that's the most a bridge camera can produce. – Zoltán Csáti Jun 18 '16 at 17:13
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The picture doesn't look very blurry to me, but you are right it is not the sharpest picture either. Have you tried turning down the noise reduction (if the camera offers that feature). Some cameras also let you adjust how much the picture is sharpened. On pictures of buildings you can increase the sharpening going on compared to what you would need on a portrait. If you are not doing post-processing you are going to need to do that in camera. Also you need a tilt shift lens to shoot buildings correctly due to the focal plane. The lighting on your second picture is completely different. If you notice the top of the bushes are all lit up and that accentuates the details.

  • My entry-point camera does not have noise reduction, so I might perhaps post-process it in a software. "The lighting on your second picture is completely different. If you notice the top of the bushes are all lit up and that accentuates the details." Do you mean that where the environment is lit, the image is sharp enough or that the uneven lighting causes the blur of the bushes on the ground? – Zoltán Csáti Jun 18 '16 at 14:33
  • Unfortunately, if you can't control it, the camera probably does the heavy noise reduction and you are not going to be able to retrieve that data even with post processing. This is why pro's shoot in raw and control the noise reduction themselves afterwards. On the picture you have of the building the lighting is flat. If you were to add some lighting from the side you would see a lot more detail, assuming you used a camera that doesn't go too heavy on the noise reduction. – rob j crowe Jun 19 '16 at 2:48

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