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I own two Nikon D7100s, and right now the exposure indicators are off for both of them. They display a level of exposure, but it's not accurate. For instance, shooting in manual, with a Nikkor 18-105mm DX lens, at a shutter speed of 1/13s, f/4, I should be getting tons of overexposure. Instead, the meter is at 0, with no overexposure in the picture.

It's doing this for both cameras, where the exposure indicator doesn't match what the picture should look like. I've checked throughout the settings of the camera, and can't find anything in particular to correct this. Any ideas?

closed as unclear what you're asking by mattdm, flolilo, inkista, Hueco, null Jun 15 '18 at 16:43

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    Are you using auto ISO? – Philip Kendall May 26 '16 at 15:30
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    Ditto on the ISO question. Additionally: does the meter change at all if you change the settings? What metering mode are you using? And, can you post a few samples of the problem in different situations? – mattdm May 26 '16 at 15:34
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    Silly question - do you have any exposure compensation dialed in? – Chris Walton May 26 '16 at 15:56
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    Hmmm, also: you say "I should be getting TONS of overexposure. Instead, the meter is 0, with no overexposure in the picture." That seems to suggest that the metering is in fact correct, and your assumption that there should be overexposure is wrong. That is, the meter matches the results. Is that actually the case? – mattdm May 26 '16 at 16:23
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    You said twice that the cameras shoot fine one moment, then weird the next. Do you have exposure bracketing turned on? – scottbb May 26 '16 at 23:33
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My guess- it could be the vignetting of the lens and maybe you are using evaluative metering (i.e. camera is taking readings from the areas that are vignetted)...

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    This doesn't seem likely. This is a DX lens on a DX body, both by Nikon. The is lens doesn't vignette to that extent. You'd need to have hard vignetting, like using a step-down ring with a smal filter, to get that much vignetting to significantly throw off matrix metering. Secondly, matrix metering more heavily weights (prioritizes) the focus point over the rest of the scene. There are no focus points in areas that are likely to vignette. – scottbb Sep 24 '16 at 15:20

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