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Are there any interchangeable lens cameras which have image stabilization in their body too? If yes, does it help more to compensate images's shakiness or will it negatively affect the lens' image stabilization?

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Panasonic does this on some of their camera bodies (debuting in the GX8). In this case, both systems work together for cumulative benefit. They call this Dual Image Stabilization — but beware, because other companies (I'm looking at you, Fujifilm) use that same term to simply mean optical stabilization plus cranking the ISO up to get faster shutter speeds.

As far as I know, the other systems with in-body stabilization (Olympus, Sony, Pentax) only use one or the other. It's definitely the case that any such system without close communication between the parts would make things worse rather than better.

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Are there any interchangeable lens cameras which have image stabilization in their body too?

Yes. Several manufacturers have camera body based stabilization and also offer lens based stabilization on some of their longer focal length lenses. But most of those systems are used on an "either/or" basis and not with both lens based and camera based stabilization active at the same time.

If yes, does it help more to compensate images's shakiness or will it negatively affect the lens' image stabilization?

It all depends on how you define "help more."

Lens based stabilization systems can provide more stabilization where it is needed the most - at longer focal lengths. This is because as the angle of view is narrower (longer focal length) the same amount of camera movement creates more blur. But lens based systems can only compensate for camera motion in the x and y axes (tilts/pans). This is, however, the most common type of camera motion that needs the assistance of image stabilization.

Camera based stabilization systems can provide stabilization not only on the x and y axes, but also on the z axis (rotation around the optical axis of the lens) and for shift movements (the camera and lens are both moved laterally).

If the primary camera motion is on the x and/or y axis, then lens based stabilization will help more, especially at longer focal lengths. If the primary camera motion is on the z axis or is lateral movement then the camera based systems that compensate for those types of motion will help more.

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