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I'm looking at a photo of Redwood trees, that measures 20"Hx144"L continuous,no seams. It dates from the late 1800s or early 1900s. Is that possible? Who might have produced this?

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    I don't understand why the existence of such a photo would seem remarkable to you. – dav1dsm1th Apr 4 '16 at 19:25
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    @Caleb, a drum like a much larger version of what's used for film would do the trick. But I suspect a reel-to-reel system was more likely. The print wouldn't have to be in each tank all at the same time, just all for the same length of time. – Chris H Apr 5 '16 at 6:47
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    Where do you see that print? Can you post a link to an online version of the image? What makes you believe that the print was made at the same time the photograph was taken? There are many examples of visually seamless images that were actually stitched together from many images. – null Apr 5 '16 at 6:58
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    @ChrisH Perhaps, but 8-foot tongs are way funnier. And obviously, the real difficulty back then would have been reaching the focus knob on a 5-story enlarger at a time when the man-lift hadn't been invented. – Caleb Apr 5 '16 at 11:43
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    We would regularly use developer soaked "brushes" to develop plates and prints unsuitable for trays. "Mops" were used to process large photomurals laying on the floor of specialized darkrooms. The image was created using point-light source illumination pointing downward onto the oversized strips of photo paper that were later montaged into a continuous image. – Stan May 26 '16 at 5:56
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Photography was born in 1827. Soon photo engineering was advancing at a rapid pace. In 1890, the Cyclographe a foyer variable was marketed by J. Damoizeau of Paris. This camera has a spring motor that rotates the camera. The result was a panoramic view 360⁰. The camera could be stopped in its rotation making the view any desired angle. What followed was a parade many different camera designs that recorded on film a panoramic view. I have a print, similar, taken at the Port of New York, my father’s regiment, the 42nd Rainbow, embarking for France in World War 1. Modern Panoramic cameras continued in production to the present era.

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Photographic paper was made in rolls and cut later, so continuous photo of this size was possible. Photos of that size could have been developed using sponges and other tools, so wet processing of such a big piece of paper was most likely also possible at that time. Exposure would have to be very long, but I think it was also doable.

Who might have produced this in late 1800 or early 1900? A photographic studio that wanted to show their capabilities? Photographic paper and film manufacturer? A serious hobbyist? John Muir himself?

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