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I have seen few photos on a news website and I want to use these images on my commercial website. All these images have third party copyrights mentioned. How to know if it is OK to use these images with exact same copyright attributions?

For example: See page http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2317079/Airlines-launch-online-upgrade-auctions-spare-seats-business-class.html

I like images 3, 4 and 5 from top. I would love to use these on my commercial website but I can't find the photographer who took these so that I can ask his permission. What is best way out?

Is it OK to use these photos in exactly same manner with same attributions?

Thanks Sal

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    I do not agree with the aproach. "I cant find the photographer", but the question is well written and a totally valid one. – Rafael Jan 27 '16 at 18:06
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    Downvoted because this question doesn't exhibit any research effort. – inkista Jan 27 '16 at 19:32
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    The Daily Mail have a reputation for using photos without permission, and without any attribution or payment to the photographer. So don't assume their use of the photos is legal. – vclaw Jan 29 '16 at 0:15
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I have seen few photos on a news website and I want to use these images on my commercial website. All these images have third party copyrights mentioned. How to know if it is OK to use these images with exact same copyright attributions?

You contact the copyright owner of each image and secure permission to use the image. You can't just take the image from the web site and use it yourself.

Is it OK to use these photos in exactly same manner with same attributions?

No.

Whether the image is a stock photo or not doesn't change the answer, but since you've tagged your question , take a moment to consider how stock photography works. When you license a stock image, you specify how long you want to use the image, how you want to use the image (editorial, advertising, internal, etc.), where you want to use the image (online, print, video, etc.), whether you want an exclusive license, and more. Next, the provider figures out how much they'll charge you for the kind of license you specified. Finally, you pay them money in return for the right to use that image. Considering that, if I see that image on your web site and want to use it on my web site, do you think the owner of said image will say that I don't need to pay to use it because you've already paid? The answer is no. If I want to use the image, I have to get my own license from the owner.

I would love to use these on my commercial website but I can't find the photographer who took these so that I can ask his permission.

Frankly, that's a lame excuse, and the obvious rebuttal is that if you can't find the copyright owner then you can't use the image. It took me all of 15 seconds to find a Twitter account for Roland Hoskins, and about as long to find an e-mail address for Qantas media contacts. Even if you can't find the right party yourself, you could always contact the Daily Mail Online at one of the many phone numbers or e-mail addresses given in its impressed and ask for their help.

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    Nice way to put it. "Frankly, that's a lame excuse". – Rafael Jan 27 '16 at 18:05
  • If I had an excuse I would have used already and not asked question. I did not have any excuse to begin with. Thanks for rest of the answer. It helps. – Sal Jan 28 '16 at 2:11
  • btw Roland hasn't logged on on his twitter account for approx 2.5 years. – Sal Jan 28 '16 at 2:30
  • Anybody knows what (c) PA means in tinyurl.com/h2h72jl ? I haven't used anything other than purchased photos so far so don't have much idea. – Sal Jan 28 '16 at 3:12
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    Probably the Press Association – jcaron Jan 29 '16 at 0:04

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