4
\$\begingroup\$

I have a 100 year old picture on what appears to be mounted on cardboard. How can I preserve it?

I haven't tried anything to preserve it other then keeping it between paper, which isn't working.

How do you keep the picture from disintegrating?

\$\endgroup\$
0

2 Answers 2

1
\$\begingroup\$

You should consult a conservator. The print sounds like it is attached to a non-archival material, which is destroying the photograph. Start by asking at an art frame shop. The non-archival material must be removed from the photograph to prevent further deterioration. Simply sealing the photograph and offending cardboard in a bag together will not preserve the image.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

The physical enemies of photographs include obvious villains (like direct sunlight, insects and rodents) and those that are more subtle: adhesives that degrade over time, sulfur compounds that can be given off by wood or rubber and trigger fading, and high humidity that can encourage mold growth.

...

Unmounted Albumen Prints

Unmounted albumen prints (and those that have been removed from old, deteriorating mounts) provide a special problem: they have an alarming tendency to curl. Some collectors and institutions hinge them at four corners, but we believe we've stumbled onto a much better solution: carefully slip each print into a strong, crystal-clear polyester envelope. The envelope can then be attached to a piece of mat board with a hinged overmat, and framed if desired. This holds the image flat and provides support for the print; the envelope can not be seen once the print is framed.

...

Larger Photographic Prints

Have a stack of larger photographs? You'll get the most protection for the money by putting each one in a separate polyethylene bag. This is a quick solution for images that are not going to be individually matted.

...

Because wood can give off harmful chemicals, most experts advise using metal frames.

...

When displaying photographs, please be aware that exposure to sunlight or unfiltered fluorescent lights can cause or accelerate fading. Ultraviolet-filtering acrylic sheets can be used in place of glass in frames, reducing the risk somewhat. Under no circumstances should photographs be placed in direct window light. This is especially important for very early images and for color prints.

Source: The American Museum of Photography on "Preserving & Protecting Photographs"

\$\endgroup\$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.