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I need to update my Canon 350D to a newer version.

I'm considering models like 700D or 70D.

But what bothers me most is that they all seem to have touchscreen ... which I hate (for various reasons I could detail if necessary).

So is it that Canon went all-in with the touch-screen in which case I should probably consider moving to Nikon?

Otherwise, which models are still available to me?

Subjective comments:

Shouldn't this decision be left to the user? The fact that the professional models just don't have a touchscreen is a proof that it is a gadget feature, isn't it?

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this seems to be a rant, not a real question. – Please Read Profile Oct 28 '15 at 2:01
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    The decision is up to the user. If the feature is so poorly implemented, people will buy other cameras without it. – dpollitt Oct 28 '15 at 2:19
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You can disable touch screen control on a 700D or 70D in the menus.

So, frankly, I think your assumption that you have to get a different camera or switch systems because you loathe them and find them to be simply a novelty feature is wrong.

On top of that, I have some cameras without touch screens and one with it, and I find the utility of it (and of that other "novelty" feature, wi-fi) to be supremely useful. Certainly, AF-point selection is much quicker and easier when you can just tap on a touchscreen. But personal tastes vary.

Which is why Canon lets you turn off the touchscreen controls if you want.

[addendum]
I also think your assumption that a pro camera not having a feature is proof that that feature is useless for everyone is also incorrect. The 1-series pro Canon dSLRs don't have mode dials. Do you believe this makes a mode dial a useless feature? Does it "harm the usability" of your camera to have one?

  • I appreciate to read that it can be turned off. I read somewhere else that one consequence of having touchscreen was "having less buttons" which let me think some options were touchscreen-accessible-only. I'm not rejecting novelty, but a possible trend of always adding features that at some point harm usability. – Augustin Riedinger Oct 28 '15 at 2:09

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