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I have seen some photographers take photos while they are walking in a hallway or on street, etc.. where the setup is the person is walking towards the photographer, the photographer is backing backwards with the same pace to keep a constant distance and assistant is also walking with for example a softbox holding it over the person and they are I guess freezing the motion with those flash shots.

I am using Nikon system and I know some about AutoFocus Continuous mode, but it has many options like 3D-mode, Group mode, 9 focus points mode, etc... What type of focusing you select to be able to pull this off and get sharp and in focus images?

I do have a lens that has vibration reduction built in. ( 70-200mm v II )

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Doing as you mentioned by keeping same distance and moving backwards usually produces the best results. Note using manual focus is usually the most accurate option.

Using the continuous auto modes works quite well on the pro line sports camera and not too bad on the better consumer models.

You should really read the Nikon documentation for understanding those focus modes you mentioned and test them out. Understanding the technicals then actual practice is where it's at in any type of photography technique.

  • The camera I have should be able to handle it - Nikon D-810 - but documnetation didn't help much, it is just saying if object is moving slowly use 9 focus points, if moving faster use for example 51 focus points, and 3-D if it is unknown where it will be! but this one we know where it is going and doesn't move erratically so there should be a best way for this scenario. – user1899082 Jul 29 '15 at 12:24
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The included documentation often does lack. I don't have that camera but you should be able to find further very detailed info on the Nikon website discussing each feature.

Here's a couple links to get you started. They have a lot to offer there.

http://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/dslr/basics/

http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Learn-And-Explore/index.page

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