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I am new to the world of photography and purchased Canon EOS 600D. Along with that I got the below basic lenses i.e.. the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 and EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6. III.

With these two lenses, I am able to take regular and distant pics. Now what I am also looking for a lens for family portraits, individual portraits and wedding/party pics.... just personal shots and perhaps One lens that I can use to shoot an entire wedding.. may sound a bit optimistic but its just as a secondary photogs.... From my part, rather than shooting qns in air , i have gone thru your articles and some others and shortlisted the following lenses in descending value offer per my very limited undrstanding. Would appreciate if you can please help me in selecting best lens.

  1. Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM....
  2. Canon EF 35mm f/2 (1.4) IS USM Lens – Costly for me, so until it have great value, I will not go for it....
  3. Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM Macro Lens – Costly for me, but if valued i can buy....
  4. Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM....
  5. Canon 50 mm f1.8 – AED 300 (Cheapest, so until its very different form 50mm f1.4, I can go for this).

Also lot of people suggest Canon ES 70-200 f/4L (0r 2.8) – As its a zoom lens, why people are suggesting for even indoor wedding pics also? Or is this better or produce equivalent pics then primes like 85 or 50 mm for portraits and indoor low lights photos also?

Please help, as my couple of days research & plenty of choice has confused me to the core.

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    Wow! There are a lot of questions concerning photography to which the answers are going to be largely based on opinion (e.g. should I shoot in program, shutter priority, aperture priority, or manual; is bokeh good or bad). If you're going to eliminate these kinds of questions, you might as well shut down this site. – BillDOe Jun 25 '15 at 5:25
  • @BillOer re "... One lens that I can use to shoot an entire wedding as a secondary photographer, party in one go without changing. ..." A single prime is POSSIBLE but will be extremely limiting.You ask 'why a zoom' -> A: because it's a good idea BUT the 70-200 is too long in many cases in the situations you mention. You mention only Canon's own glass. I recommend thaat you look i=on lens comparison sites and compare the performance of the following lens with alternatives you might consider. Then buy one :-). Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 VC Di USD. Note it has vibration compensation inbuilt. ... – Russell McMahon Jun 25 '15 at 9:35
  • DP Review review and Results on aan EOS 7D and DxO ratings -hover over the dots near the top right end to see what lens they relate to. Note where this lens rates. That's the sharpness chart but click tabs for others. – Russell McMahon Jun 25 '15 at 9:40
  • See - opinion is fickle :-) – Russell McMahon Jun 25 '15 at 9:40
  • Maybe see: photo.stackexchange.com/questions/8518/… – inkista Jun 25 '15 at 17:26
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One could shoot an entire wedding with a 70-200mm f/2.8 IS, a 50mm f/1.4, or a 24-70mm f/2.8. Beyond that, the answer is... it depends.

To me, your list is all over the place, and it sounds like you would be best to work with the equipment you currently have and gain an understanding of photography and your equipment needs before you try to buy more stuff. More stuff isn't going to teach you much at all, only that you've spent money on things you likely don't need.

  • I like the 24-105 F/4 L lens myself. It has a pretty good zoom range and produces sharp pictures. You can certainly shoot an entire wedding with one (I have). You'll probably have to use flash in lowlight situations. With that in consideration an external power source for your flash is highly recommended. – BillDOe Jun 25 '15 at 5:34
  • Yeah that's a popular one too Bill. I just find the f/4 too limiting for my preferences. – dpollitt Jun 25 '15 at 11:47
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In your description you say you want a lens for family portraits, individual portraits and party pics. You already have your 18-55 zoom that would cover these ranges well, but you want a prime presumably for the extra speed, and maybe a bit more background blur am I right?

Now, traditionally a portrait lens would be a 100/135mm equivalent, but for the scenarios you mention you won't have any ability to step back and fit everything in, so you'll probably want a more normal 50mm equivalent.

Unfortunately on your crop sensor, a 50mm would crop, so the 50mm equivalent would be a 35mm lens, and once you go down to that focal length lenses get more expensive.

Of the options you have there, I'd definitely rule out anything above 50mm as it's just not going to work for family portraits or parties where you can't step back that far. 35mm would give you more angle of view so framing would be easier in those situations, but it's hard to justify the expense. You can get 50mm primes way more cheaply.

My advice? Get the 50mm f/1.8 anyway, it will always come in handy and it's a no-brainer to have one in your collection. It'll be great too if you ever move up to a full frame camera.

See if a combination of the 50mm and your 18-55 is enough for the situations you need, and if not, get a 35mm lens. If it's too expensive, shop around, you don't necessarily need it to be Canon brand.

Note: there is a non-IS predecessor to that 35mm lens, which will certainly be cheaper, though I don't know if it's still available new, you may need to get it second-hand.

  • Note: the 50mm f/1.8 is cheap not because it isn't good, but because it's a simple lens to make. It should actually be great quality for the money. – thomasrutter Jun 25 '15 at 15:05

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