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In todays photography world, is it worth buying a piece of equipment of this age/quality. Only because of my income, as a 16 year old its hard to get the 'big bucks' for high end cameras that will produce top end images. I have a 5d mark II but it was been through a lot and is coming towards its final days.

Thanks all!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Voting to close as too broad - without knowing about the price, the quality, your skills, your other equipment and your goals, this is impossible to answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Philip Kendall
    Mar 13, 2015 at 11:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ "Coming towards its final days"? If it's got a ridiculously high shutter count then you could contact Canon for a shutter and mirror box replacement quote as these are the parts subject to the greatest stresses - I'd suggest it's worth it as the 5DII is still a respectable performer even if it's a few years old. \$\endgroup\$
    – Darkhausen
    Mar 13, 2015 at 12:18

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Coming from a 5D mkII, the 1Ds mkII will be an big upgrade in terms of the number of autofocus points and the robustness of the body (which is fully weather sealed), but a downgrade in pretty much every other area, such as resolution, noise performance, video (non-existent), LCD screen (tiny, low-res and poor daylight visibility and viewable angles), live-view (also non-existent).

You will get a few extra features, such as increased number of bracketed shots, ability set shutter speed and aperture limits, but you need a firewire cable and special software to set them. The AF performance is very good, with 45 points, but AF point selection is a pain as there is no joystick, you need to use two wheels and it thus requires two hands and taking your eye off the viewfinder.

Unless you need the AF performance, i.e. you want to do a lot of sports/wildlife shots or are desperate for a 1D square body I would advise getting a new(er) 5DII when your current one dies.

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The first question that comes through my mind is : why would you need such a DSLR ?

Those cameras are aimed mainly to professionals, thus they're quite expensive. For someone like you (I do not mean any offense when I say that !), I don't think you need "that much".

If you absolutely want a full-frame (depending on your actual use of your current DSLR, and your lenses), the 6D may be the cheapest available, but still expensive.

I began shooting with a DSLR when I was 17 (but I used to take pictures with an old SLR since I was 12), and I "only" had a 1000D (entry-level, but still). Now I am 22 and I have a 100D with 3 lenses (see my profile). I do believe your best bet, budget-wise would be to buy an entry/mid-level DSLR and focus on getting good lenses.

Consider buying a high-end camera later, if you still love photograhy (which I hope you'll do !) and if you intend to make a profit out of it.

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I want to focus on the goal of producing "top end images". Except for in very narrow, highly-competitive special cases, you certainly don't need a top model camera to do so. (There's an old adage — cameras don't make photographs; photographers do). And, since you're talking about going back several years in technology, there are many areas where your current camera outperforms or is otherwise technically better than the older higher-line camera (see Matt Grum's answer).

You don't say what other equipment you have — maybe you are blessed with a collection of L glass and have a fully-outfitted portrait studio (or portable lighting gear to set one up anywhere). If you don't have great lenses for the photography you want to do, or if you haven't explored what you can do with higher-end flash photography, those things are very likely to be what you really need to do to for more top-end images. The 5D Mk II is a workhorse camera, and I'd recommend using it until it really does fall apart, saving a little for the replacement but putting the bulk of your budget into these other things.

So, fundamentally, I think it is unlikely to be worth it. When the time comes, a newer 5D Mk III (or IV, by that point?) is probably a sensible choice, but you might actually even consider stepping down a notch to the 6D line, if you can use the money to build up the rest of your gear instead.

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