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I have a Canon 350d. How do I improve the quality of images in low light? I feel like urgrading the body — but will it really help? I have a Canon 18-55 kit lens, 75-300, and a 50mm 1.8. lens. I have a 430 EXii Canon speedlite as well.

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    \$\begingroup\$ At the moment, this is probably too broad for us to give a helpful answer. Could you post some images you feel are a problem and explain precisely what you'd like to improve about them? \$\endgroup\$
    – Philip Kendall
    Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 16:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ How do I attach a pic here \$\endgroup\$ Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 17:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Edit the question and use the "attach image" button. \$\endgroup\$
    – mattdm
    Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 18:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ It should be clear that the by now ten year old Canon 350d is not going to compete well with even mediocre cameras you can buy today for $400. ISO limited to 1600, bad high ISO performance, no sensor shift, 8MP sensor, dynamic range of less than 11 EV. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Mar 11, 2015 at 18:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ @CountIblis But little of that should matter if the ISO is set to 100 (or as high as 400) and the flash used optimally. \$\endgroup\$
    – mattdm
    Commented Mar 12, 2015 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

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Without knowing what you've already tried, I'll give some suggestions which might help (although the're not specific to the 350d).

  1. Use a fast lens with the f-stop wide open (f/1.8 for example) - your 50mm lens should be ideal.
  2. Use flash if possible.
  3. Shoot in RAW mode with the highest quality setting.
  4. Use a tool like adobe lightroom for post-processing.

I had a 350d before upgrading to a 500d. The 500d supports higher ISO and has slightly better noise reduction with high ISO.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Do quality settings matter when shooting RAW with this camera? (I really don't know.) \$\endgroup\$
    – his
    Commented Mar 12, 2015 at 16:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Very good question. I believe the answer is no, it doesn't matter. The quality settings are for the JPEG. So if you take a great shot and the JPEG is fine, there's no need to post-processing with the RAW image. \$\endgroup\$
    – Stuart
    Commented Mar 13, 2015 at 23:30
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You can look at dXomark to see how much better low-light exposure you can expect. The numbers should compare within a brand and technology, even if they somehow don't tell the whole story.

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