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How was this long exposure shot by Darren Moore taken?

https://secure.flickr.com/photos/61094835@N07/13534638135/

Apparently these stones are in the sea:

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4101/4920024841_6d6f444f11.jpg

But there's sand and rocks at their start. Where did they go? Were they edited out?

Also, how does one achieve the effect where the horizon is completely gone and the ground and sky turn into one? How are there no reflections at all?

  • I've seen photos of two breakwaters at Felixstowe with opposing curvatures. So, there may be a third. Someone who lives nearby maybe able to advise. Otherwise, it could be that there is a slight gap between the sand and the breakwater and the photographer is using a wide angle lens while standing on the sand. – B Shaw Nov 17 '14 at 4:32
  • The tide's in a lot further in the fist photo. – alex Nov 17 '14 at 5:25
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    ... and it's a foggy day (or night). – user13451 Nov 17 '14 at 5:43
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    Tags include "ND110", so probably a B&W ND110 neutral density filter was used to get the longer shutter speed. – inkista Nov 17 '14 at 21:02
  • Yeah, he does use dark ND filters. I don't know how that makes the ground/sea look so silky smooth, though. – Stavros Korokithakis Nov 18 '14 at 11:56
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For starters, one is monochrome and the other is in color. By using a color filter (most likely in post) the gray tonal values of the different colored water and sky can be matched.

But there's sand and rocks at their start. Where did they go? Were they edited out?

Difference in perspective by shooting from a different position (closer) with a different focal length (wider) and a higher tide.

Also, how does one achieve the effect where the horizon is completely gone and the ground and sky turn into one? How are there no reflections at all?

Difference in atmospheric and surface conditions. The fog has rolled in, the tide is higher, and the water is calmer. The long exposure evens out any ripples in the water by capturing them as they cross the entire frame.

  • Thank you, I'll have to try and experiment with these sorts of photos to see if I can match the results. – Stavros Korokithakis Nov 17 '14 at 14:20

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