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Wonderful photo of the streets of Athens I found. I'm an amateur photographer curious to learn how to make my digital photos (Canon Rebel T3i) look more like film. Like this photo here, it has that film look. Are there picture style settings that I can change and shoot in to achieve these looks, or is it all just understanding manual setting? I'm really eager to learn how to take well composed photos that have a crisp, vintage look to them.

Wonderful photo of the streets of Athens I found. I'm an amateur photographer curious to learn how to make my digital photos (Canon Rebel T3i) look more like film. Like this photo here, it has that film look. Are there picture style settings that I can change and shoot in to achieve these looks, or is it all just understanding manual setting? I'm really eager to learn how to take well composed photos that have a crisp, vintage look to them. Please help.

Another image that shows the kind of look I want to learn how to shoot digitally.

Another example

There is this 'soft' look in this photograph. I love the coloring.

The colors and the sharpness.

In this image I am curious to know how it was taken to achieve the fisheye look? An app on a photo? A fisheye lens on the physical camera of the phone?

closed as unclear what you're asking by mattdm, TFuto, Paul Cezanne, AJ Henderson, Olin Lathrop Nov 13 '14 at 18:49

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    What is "the film look" that you seek to emulate? Each film has a different characteristic to it. I see reduced saturation in some photos, high key in others, and increased saturation in others. – user13451 Nov 13 '14 at 2:07
  • I guess I see a sort of "soft" look to the images. With great detail and color. I don't believe these were shot with film, so I was curious as to what I could do digitally to achieve this look as well. – fransweeneytodd Nov 13 '14 at 2:14
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    @FranceneRay Please see PSA on “What's this effect?” questions, and edit your question accordingly. Film can have a lot of looks. (Your description in a comment above helps, but it should be front-and-center in the question, and summarized descriptively in the title for best results.) – mattdm Nov 13 '14 at 2:37
  • Okay thank you. I edited the title, I hope it is a little more clear now. I don't even know how to put the effect into words. – fransweeneytodd Nov 13 '14 at 2:41
  • Better with the description. It might be even better, though, if you could choose one or two examples which really seem to demonstrate a similar effect. – mattdm Nov 13 '14 at 18:52
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I don't see a huge amount of commonality in your examples. The most common "vintage look" we get asked about is usually a lifted black point (so the darkest blacks are actually gray) along with color shifts (blue, yellow, green...). (See How can this brightly colored yet gentle pastel-color effect be achieved?) for an example.)

But I don't see that here, so much. The first example has very deep blacks, and might even be an example of a "beach bypass" effect (in film, leaving out the step which removes silver oxide, leading to increased contrast and grain by effectively overlaying a black and white photo on the color one). This seems true of the "FOTOAUTOMATICA" picture as well.

The middle ones just seem to be colorful compositions of colorful scenes.

And the last looks like it was shot with a lenbaby fisheye or some other low cost effects lens, with no special color or other treatment.

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Vintage look comes from postprocessing of colors (lower color temperature, lifted black point, less saturation, less contrast, less blue component, a bit of purple tinting) and certain effects simulating lens deficiencies, such as blurs, vignetting, reflections because of improper lens coatings, etc.)

Crispness comes from local contrast enhancements.

(None of your pictures are good examples for crips, vintage look though, I guess. :-) )

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It's not really possible, because the way film works and sensors work is completely different. Sensor cells accept light from the front only and are not affected by light striking adjacent cells. The crystals of silver bromide in film are sensitive to light striking them from any angle, so light bouncing around inside the emulsion causes film images to look a bit 'softer' due to this effect, called 'irradiation'. Film can actually capture more detail than digital sensors, but it looks 'softer', because the light diffuses within the film itself and affects adjacent crystals. That does not happen with sensors.

You can see my images here, all taken on film:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ornello/

  • Is that what you see at work in these images? – mattdm Nov 13 '14 at 18:49
  • I don't know how they were taken, so I cannot answer that. – Ornello Nov 13 '14 at 19:09
  • Serious question: If you can't tell the difference by looking at the results, are you sure that the difference is so inherent? – mattdm Nov 13 '14 at 19:18
  • I'm not sure I understand your comment. The reproduction of those images is poor. Look at my images if you want a clear presentation of film. – Ornello Nov 14 '14 at 20:49
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    The question is, essentially, "How can I create images that look like these?". Your answer is "It's not really possible. Here, look at some different images." That doesn't strike me as helpful. – mattdm Nov 14 '14 at 20:57

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