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I just got back to the US after a trip to Mexico. I took wonderful pictures while traveling. However, when I got home, my camera didn't work. When I turn on the camera, the the only feedback I get is that the Memory Card Access lamp flashes once (if the memory card is present). The LCD screen is blank (black) and all buttons provide no function. I ordered a new battery, but that didn't work.

The only thing I can think of that may have caused this issue is that I dropped the camera from a height of 3 feet in the airport. The camera had it's lens attached and was in it's decently padded carrying case. Unfortunately, I didn't try the camera until I got home, so I cannot say if that was the problem or not.

I'm preparing to send it off to Nikon for repair since I'm still under warranty, but I'm looking for a quick fix since I will be traveling again in 7 days and I'm sure the camera won't be through the repair process in that time.

Any thoughts?

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    Yes, the quick fix is to buy a new one. – dpollitt Aug 16 '14 at 3:06
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    @dpollitt Buying a new camera does not fix the broken one – Raddfood Aug 16 '14 at 22:46
  • Well it's not like it is a Nintendo NES cartridge that you can just blow into to get working again(myth). The fix is to take it to a repair shop(timely) or buy a new camera(quick) . – dpollitt Aug 17 '14 at 2:43
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    @Raddfood why do you think it can be fixed, especially a "quick fix"? Replacing it is the quickest way to get a working camera again... – jwenting Aug 18 '14 at 10:25
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    Affect of drops varies greatly. I dropped a Minolta 7D which has in body antishake about 1 foot onto concrete (it rolled out of a car door when I (stupidly) pulled out a long extension cord. The antishake mechanism died. | I (stupidly) dropped a Minolta 5D, also with in body antishake about 2 + feet (below elbow height) onto a bare board dance/hall floor. It was hard enough and loud enough that many people in the room made loud exclamations. It survived unscathed - maybe all the sympathy helped. Nikon will "advise you" if it has accident damage. – Russell McMahon Aug 18 '14 at 15:19
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Some basic troubleshooting you can do, with anything really, is to systematically test everything you can control. In this case I would try it with/without different batteries and memory cards, try different buttons to see if you can get a response out of the screen. Try the DoF button to see if that causes anything to happen in the lens. Try different mode dials. Does it have just the LCD or does it have a screen on the top that displays information and does it display information? Does the viewfinder come on when the camera is powered on/when the shutter is pressed? Can you take pictures and view them after transferring off of the memory card? Does the camera show up on the computer when plugged in via USB?

Any of these things can be clues to what is wrong and lead you to a solution. Though, as you have described it thus far, it's broken. Send it to Nikon, plead ignorance, and hope they fix it under warranty.

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quick fix: no way. Certainly not with the information you provide.
As is, if you drop a camera from that height the best assumption is that it's dead as a dodo, probably cracked and otherwise damaged components throughout, stuff out of allignment, etc. etc. etc.

Get a new one, and be more careful with it. Sending it in under warranty with some fake story (if you mention you dropped it the warranty claim will get correctly denied, or should be) is dishonest.


Of course if you're very lucky, it's just a single loose electrical contact somewhere, but good luck finding it without doing a lot more damage, then reassembling the camera without breaking more.

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