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I have been using a Sunpak DigiFlash 3000 mounted on my D3100. Mounting and removing it has not been a problem until today. I mounted and screwed it on the way I usually do, but today it stuck and will not budge to be removed. What can I do to get it to unscrew to remove?

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Step 0) Make sure you're turning the screw the right way. :) I've inadvertently tightened the flash on the shoe while trying to get it off by not doing this.

Chances are good that the spring-loaded locking pin is stuck. You can try using a thin piece of metal between the shoe and the foot, to get it to disengage if it's only partially in the hole. But your safest surest way is probably to disassemble the flash foot. Remove the batteries, first, as you really don't want to be shocking yourself. Then, with a small philips-head screw driver, remove the four screws on the foot assembly base. There will be a small wire harness that you can unplug to lift the body of the flash away from the foot. From there, there's usually one small circuit board on the foot held in with four screws. Once you remove that, you can attack the pins from the other side.

Do not lose the spring for the locking pin. (It will likely go sproing on its own when the circuit board comes free. Hunt it down and keep it safe for reassembly).

Obviously, if you're not handy with mechanical and electronic things, this may not be the path for you, but it only requires changing-a-hard-drive dexterity, not fixing-a-watch dexterity. I've removed and put back the foot assemblies on my 580EX, YN-560, and SB-26, and it wasn't a huge deal.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Obligatory Cautionary Note: the charge that fires a flash is stored in one or more big capacitors that are recharged immediately after each discharge, so... REMOVING BATTERIES WILL NOT PREVENT YOU FROM GETTING SHOCKED. Nor will it prevent the possibility of shorting a blast of high voltage to a control contact with a metal shim. Fortunately, AFAIK only old flash designs send the full voltage through the trigger pin. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 22:44

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