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What effects were applied to this photo, and do they have a name?

Is the procedure called something specific? I notice a lot of photos from this photographer have this effect of slightly pastel-ish colorization, in which colors are a bit pleasantly and unnaturally off, but I can't describe in which way specifically.

enter image description here

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    Looks like a straightforward saturation boost to me. Perhaps a boost to the blue and purple channels in this particular shot. Jul 17, 2014 at 14:18

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It looks like a normal image taken with the subject laying down in the sand. It doesn't appear anything special was done at all.

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    This. Look very carefully at the right (left in the picture) lens of the sunglasses. You'll see a human-shaped thing with a whitish circle beside it. This is a 30"-ish gold reflector, a white balance that's verging on tungsten (with a little residual warmth) on an day with light but nearly complete overcast. The magic happened when the shutter was clicked, not in post-processing.
    – user28116
    Jul 17, 2014 at 16:02
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    @user28116 - nice catch on the reflector, I missed that since I didn't view the image full screen.
    – AJ Henderson
    Jul 17, 2014 at 16:12
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    user28116: You should write your own answer, as I think you nailed it on the head. Magic was done in real life with light, not in post. You deserve and up-vote and an accepted answer. ;)
    – jrista
    Jul 17, 2014 at 17:20
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    @user28116 - no worries, this is really a fairly basic answer. Your observation is more upvote worthy and as JRista points out, you should make your own answer so we can upvote it.
    – AJ Henderson
    Jul 17, 2014 at 17:25
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    I see it a little differently: AJ Henderson's answer answered the question as originally asked (after a quick edit of the answer; the first stab was speculation that was immediately retracted); I merely added details concerning why heroic post-processing wasn't necessary and moved a comment-in-progress from the question (which, being a "what is this effect", I assumed was going to be closed/held in rapid order) to an existing correct answer when it became available. What's important is that an answer be definitive in some sense, not who gets credit. Gamification irks me.
    – user28116
    Jul 18, 2014 at 2:49

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