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I photographed my parents' house at various stages of painting it and then used Hugin to align them ("No exposure correction, low dynamic range") for the purpose of making a slideshow. The photos are satisfactory after alignment, except the first one, which is so overexposed in the top-right corner that the house blends into the building in the background (my fault, not Hugin's). I want to keep exposure on the house more or less as it is, but dial it down for the background so that the house gets the spotlight as it were.

enter image description here

My experience with photo-editing is very limited, but I think it will be difficult to do what I want with just the photograph by itself because the information on the background has been lost through the overexposure (if I'm wrong, let me know). Luckily, I have other photos such as below where that information is preserved.

enter image description here

enter image description here

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How should I go about fixing the first photo? The most naive way would be to pick one of the other photos, copy a whole chunk of it, and plop it onto the first one, but

  1. I'm not confident about splicing and stitching photos together neatly and this shouldn't be the kind of thing that requires a painstaking effort.
  2. The pasted on part would need color adjustment so as not to look out of place, and I'm not sure I know how to do that, either.

What's the most efficient way to go about this in Gimp or Hugin? I think the latter can be used to correct exposure with certain parts masked, but I have been unable to find much information about that.

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Without diving too much into details, IMO the easiest course of action is:

  1. place overexposed photo on top of good photo as a layer
  2. adjust exposure of overexposed photo to match the good photo
  3. align layers
  4. erase bad photo's layer mask where the blown parts look grey/dull, use smooth and maybe partial eraser

This can be done in most editors including Paint.NET but if you are not yet used to any of them I'd suggest you try Krita which has adjustment layers (non-destructive adjustments) which allows you to readjust image.

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