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I accidentally pressed the button to open the back of my camera but held the cover so it didn't open and no light got inside. It winds automatically and I could hear the sound of film winding but not too long. There were 9 photos taken before the accident. Now the count says 0 and the camera won't open when I turn it on. It is a Canon PrimaZoom 65. Is there any chance of getting the 9 photos I took while also finishing the current roll (there should be about 27 photos left)?

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It's probably pulled the entire film inside the canister, leaving you nothing to grab to re-spool it.

You have no option [short of dismantling the canister in total darkness to get the the leader back out - not recommended] but to get the film developed & see what comes out.

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What do you mean it won't open when you turn it on? Do you mean that the lens won't extend?

It's hard to determine exactly what situation you have here. I can't find the manual for this camera online, but I found the manual for the Prima Zoom 85, which I am assuming is a similar model. It does say in the manual of that camera:

If "0" blinks in the frame counter, the film has not loaded properly. Reload the film.

If the camera malfunctions while a film is loaded, do not remove the film. Take the camera to a Canon service facility with the film still inside.

If you force the film out of the camera, the camera or film may be damaged.

In actuality, a Canon service facility is probably not going to offer service on an old point-and-shoot film camera at this stage. If you're lucky enough to find a local repairer of film cameras, it could be worth giving them a call to see if they could help you. I know it's disappointing, but you might have to accept that these photos may have to be sacrificed.

If you do manage to get the film cassette out of the camera, and the film has all been fully rewound inside, you can pretty easily retrieve the film leader and reload the film. You would need to shoot the first 10 or 11 photos in complete darkness, so that you are sure to advance past the frames that have already been exposed. By the way, skip the "DIY" methods shown in the video and just buy a proper film retriever – they work great first time, every time. Just don't yank too much film out of the film cassette.

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