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I was at a party and someone who didn't know how to use the camera slightly opened the back film door. It only opened slightly and i shut it instantly and it was at night so I suppose only a bit of light was exposed, but I had taken photos, so when I shut the door my display went from 7 photos to saying I hadn't taken any. Does this mean the film has rewound and not viable, could it have damaged my camera somehow and I need to take it out? Or should I just keep shooting with it?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Opening the back does reset the counter on most cameras., but it will not cause the film to rewind. Which camera model do you have? \$\endgroup\$ Jun 25, 2023 at 13:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ The answer is... It depends. Almost certainly some of the film will be rendered unusable by this incident, but it's also likely that there'll be film that hasn't been affected at all. You say you "shut it instantly", but what you claim is an instant was likely several seconds - and that is plenty of time for even dim light to do damage. The most important thing here in my opinion is the valuable lesson - don't hand your camera to someone who is going to mess around with it. Warn people that they can ruin your photos by doing so. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Jun 25, 2023 at 16:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ See also: My film camera’s exposures count went back to 1? and Opening back of my film camera \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Jun 25, 2023 at 16:29

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Almost certainly your film is not rewound, so just keep shooting it, keeping in mind that you have 7–9 shots less than the counter says (camera could advance the film like it does on a new roll when you closed the back).

Next two frames may be affected by the light, but all the frames after that will be fine. Just listen to the sound of the film rewinding after the shots, if you hear it, the film is there and advancing.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok thank you!!!! \$\endgroup\$ Jun 30, 2023 at 7:45
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If the film rewound, it's in the cartridge and will not come out. You can try making shots with lens cap on: if the film does not advance it is likely completely rewound. In that case the Scrooge remedy is to use a film grabbing tool, get the beginning of the film out again, put it in the camera, make, say, 10 shots with lens cap on and then continue using the film.

The easy remedy is making sure the film is rewound and give it to development. Lost cost will be due to the cost of the film and the negative development. The lab will not make prints from the unexposed parts of the film, however, and will not bill you for them.

That's slightly annoying but not all that expensive.

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