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I take hundreds of photos of watches and have no time to input each photo into photoshop. Is there a way to get my photos to have a more white background and not the greyish look i have shown below? I use 2 strobe lights on either side of the watch and a cone diffuser around the watch. I have messed with white balance but this is as close as I can get it to white. Any help is appreciated. Camera setting : ISO 100, 1/160, f11

here is the setup

enter image description herecan see the background more grey than white

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The usual technique is to have a light for the background so that is (slightly) overexposed. With a big subject (person) it can be a flash behind the subject and aimed at the background, in your case it could be a light behind a translucent background.

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To ensure you have a perfectly white background and a perfectly exposed watch, you need a third light which needs to light up the backdrop and has to be at least 3-stops brighter than the light hitting the watch from the front.

It doesn't matter if the light is behind the backdrop or being lit from the front, (in which case, the strobe must be placed behind the watch and sufficient measures to be taken to ensure that this light does not spill on to the watch and only hits the backdrop), and has to be way brighter than the subject.

To achieve a pure white background, the subject and the background need to be lit individually.

If you don't have three lights, then use one of the lights to light background and the other as a 45° light from the front right or left and a reflector card on the other side to light the watch

Having two lights just from the front, irrespective of how much you increase the power, will not work and continue to give you a grey background or a white background with an overexposed watch.

This article will explain the Inversed squared law. What is the inverse-square law, and how does it apply to lighting for photography?

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Try increasing the power of the flashes that light the backdrop. Or move the watch closer to the backdrop and adjusting the light source accordingly

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I think you need a base lightbox, with so much light on top you are losing contrast of the main object while the background is still gray.

enter image description here

Image from picturecorrect.com

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