1
\$\begingroup\$

Trying to determine what film size these old negatives are. The filmstock width is 2-3/4" (70 mm). There are no sprocket holes. The image size is 2" x 2-3/8" (50 mm x 60mm). I have run across some old negatives in both color and black and white. The images appear to be circa 1950s.

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$

2 Answers 2

2
\$\begingroup\$

In that era, many firms engaged in "school" business. They bid on the task of making school year books making group pictures and senior portraits. They used custom roll film cameras made by Beattie, Camerz (Photo Control), and Nord Photo Enginering, and others. Kodak 70mm film was commonly used in color and black & white.

It was big business. I worked for Nord, we also made special "package printers". These printers made up the packages that contained sets of multiple sizes. A typical package was 1 5x7 -- 2 3 1/2 X 5 -- 4 wallets and 16 postage stamp size pictures.

These cameras were loaded with 70mm, or 46mm or 35mm film in 100 ft. rolls.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Alan Marcus, thanks for the reponse! \$\endgroup\$
    – Richart53
    Mar 23, 2023 at 15:07
1
\$\begingroup\$

116 and 616 format were also 70mm wide and unperforated.

The Kodak Brownie Jr 6-16 and Kodak Target 6-16 both used 616 format film.

enter image description here

The last cameras made to shoot 616 were produced in 1948, but existing stocks sold well into the early 1950s. The film was made until 1984.

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks Michael C for your input. I do remember using 616 film in an old Brownie when I was a kid. In fact I found some 616 in this old box of negatives that had images measuring 2.5" x 4.25" which scanned very well. \$\endgroup\$
    – Richart53
    Mar 25, 2023 at 22:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.