0
\$\begingroup\$

Gigapixel is a program by Topaz Labs that is able to enlarge small and low-quality (pixelated) photos, while enriching them with higher quality details (between and within the original pixels) by drawing upon a training dataset of thousands of photographs.

If you start with a grainy, old photo taken on a lousy camera, then process it through Gigapixel by upscaling it, for example, 4x in size, it comes out looking as if it came from a UHD DSLR and flawless. Let's just say it looks 10x better than the original, even at a 25% zoom out, and assume that no weird alien-like AI artifacts appear.

Now that it's high quality, what happens then if you downscale this high resolution image back down to its original size (one-fourth of the 4x blow up)? It would still look 10x better than the original right?

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ Did you try? And would it look better than the image processed at it original size? And how much would it look like the original? If I scrub an old and grainy Sopwith Camel image to make it an F-22 image the new image will be good quality... \$\endgroup\$
    – xenoid
    Nov 28, 2022 at 9:58

1 Answer 1

8
\$\begingroup\$

I think you are expecting far too much from Gigapixel; which is not surprising given the amount of BS in some of their marketing. Many of their marketing examples are just... umm... misleading at best... I can only assume they start with a decent image and then destroy it.

I have tested this over the years with many of their example images where I cannot even come close to recreating the results they show (denoise/sharpening/etc)...

For example; this is the current home page for Gigapixel:

enter image description here

But this is the kind of results Gigapixel actually generates when given the original quality image they show:

enter image description here

And no, 6x enlargement and different algorithms do not give notably better results with this source image.

That said; given a decent enough image upsampling (with Gigapixel or other means) can improve the overall IQ/resolution notably, and it will generally retain some of that upon downsampling back to the original resolution.

And FWIW, I have fully paid and current subscription to all of the Topaz products... I find them moderately useful on occasion.

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ …and it's soooo slooooow. I find On1 to be fairly comparable & a whole lot faster. [I've only tested the Topaz demo, I own On1] \$\endgroup\$
    – Tetsujin
    Nov 28, 2022 at 19:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you couldn't re-create the same results with their own software, why don't you whistleblow them? Everyone needs to know this, This is a bombshell news, corruption at the very top. Not buying Topaz ever! \$\endgroup\$
    – user610620
    Nov 29, 2022 at 3:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user610620, If I had to whistleblow every bit of misleading advertising, even if only associated with photography, I would never have a moment to ever do anything else... not to mention the overwhelming amounts of wrong/bad information being provided by "professional" lessons/instruction online... hell, there's even a black non-reflective umbrella for lighting now (theblackdish.com) \$\endgroup\$ Nov 29, 2022 at 14:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Or email Topaz support to get the steps on how they processed it before buying \$\endgroup\$
    – user610620
    Nov 29, 2022 at 22:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @user610620, I knew what I was getting when buying... I used the trials and tested for myself. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 30, 2022 at 0:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.