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That's the portrait whose vintage atmosphere I'd like to simulate in my "normal" portraits.

enter image description here

Do you know a default or a famous (and available on the web) preset which provides similar effects?

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    \$\begingroup\$ If you look for "vintage preset lightroom" on the internet, do you find anything that helps? If not, could you please edit your question to include what you've searched for, what you've found, and why it didn't do what you wanted? This makes it easier for people to suggest something that you haven't looked at already. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 23, 2022 at 11:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also see photo.stackexchange.com/q/97686/57929 which shares a little of this look, and photo.stackexchange.com/q/112295/57929 which also has some dehaze. Overall, it's far better to learn how to do it than just slap a preset on it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Tetsujin
    Nov 23, 2022 at 12:21

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This effect can be obtained with adjustment layers, with the advantage that these layers can be applied to different images without altering the original. Of course, the type of shot and scene influence the final result. Starting from this image

enter image description here

First of all, the example photo has grain. This is obtained with a layer, gray 50%, with a noise filter 12%, Soft light mode

noise

Adding an adjustment photo filter layer, dark brown color (#362221 in this example) at 90%, Saturation mode:

sepia

Desaturate the photo with a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer, saturation= -30%:

saturation

To even out the yellowish-white of the paper, another photo filter adjustment layer, yellow (#ffe243) at 25%:

enter image description here

Edit after @Tetsujin comment

I didn't see it, there's a texture of brush strokes throughout the photograph except for the skin of the model. A top layer with the masked models filled with a pattern of this texture, overlay, 25%

brush

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    \$\begingroup\$ I think of adjustment layers as Photoshop, not Lightroom, and a different approach than presets, but the approach is a good one. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 23, 2022 at 15:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ Not bad at all. The OP's picture really 'floats' in the mids though & has brush strokes. I took your result, floated up the mids a bit, 'un-dehazed', pushed it slightly warmer it to make it glow a bit & used a Ps charcoal layer to try get something like the brush strokes. See what you think. i.stack.imgur.com/0HW4T.jpg [This was all, except the charcoal, done in CameraRAW, so I guess LR could do it too] \$\endgroup\$
    – Tetsujin
    Nov 23, 2022 at 16:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ One thing after your edit [though I still don't think you've got the glow yet;) - if you need to mask to get the look, this cannot be "a preset". It might be two, but it can't be just one. I'm still seeing in the OP's original something which is perhaps reducing the colour palette, or 'averaging' it somehow, like some kind of advanced Median filter. I can't get anything like it in Ps without totally overcooking it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Tetsujin
    Nov 23, 2022 at 18:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ –- if you need to mask to get the look, this cannot be "a preset"– You are right, in this case, is not a preset what the OP is looking for, the original image is masked :-) otherwise it is not possible to apply the brush strokes on the floor, wall and clothes and not on the skin \$\endgroup\$
    – Danielillo
    Nov 23, 2022 at 18:51
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I would suggest you create your own adaptive preset.

I used three masks:

  • mask 1 is a "luminosity" mask selecting the entire range (all); this is for overall adjustments, saturation, lifting blacks, etc.
  • Mask 2 is a "select subject" mask; this is for selective edits of just the girls, sharpness, noise, etc.
  • Mask 3 is a "select background" mask for selective BG edits, setting texture and clarity to 100 along with a high level of sharpening causes artifacts to appear (texture).

I then saved it as a user preset only applying the masks and supporting fading the edits (amount slider).

enter image description here

Now, when the preset is applied the AI masks will select the subject(s) and background in the new image and apply the edits. Any other global edits you have made in the other adjustment panels will not be overwritten. The preset can be faded out or applied extra heavy as I did here (113%). And the separate masks can be modified as well as the adjustments they apply.

enter image description here

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You can professionally create an old atmosphere in a photo in the Lightroom software in the basic or general section by manipulating the color section and increasing the temp level to warm and at the same time by reducing the vibrance level, you can somewhat change the atmosphere of a photo as The old one changed, because usually the old photos that were the result of negatives have a warm color temperature and usually do not have high color saturation, and even on the surface of the photo paper there are scratches and noises, although in Photoshop software you can This made it possible, but because the Lightroom software is specifically related to photo editing for photographers, so my opinion is that you should do this in Lightroom because the access and change in the hls and hlv levels are separated in the color channels. with a much higher speed and ease, and even if it is necessary to make the above-mentioned changes in a non-global and segmented manner on certain parts of the photo by creating different masks and easily able to do it Therefore, if this photo is in my possession, by increasing the amount of tint, temp and ka The vibrance hash "not the color saturation" will bring the photo almost to the old photos, and you can even change the photo almost to monochrome "without color" and globally, the whole image with the white balance level will be somewhat warm. Brown, if you don't need color in the image.

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