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I have Canon 60D. When on recording mode the viewfinder doesn't work because the shutter is up and you can only see through the screen. This is a problem because it's much harder to find the subject and chasing it, especially when you have a zoom lens.

When I look through the viewfinder because my head is pointing to the subject and I can naturally chase it as my eyes drive the direction but looking through the screen this is not possible.

I found this optical viewfinder that attaches to the LCD screen (this eBay link) on eBay but I'm not sure how effective they are and I was wondering if anyone has used that before.

Is there any other option that can help?

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4 Answers 4

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Because the mirror must be up to record video, there's no way to use the optical viewfinder while shooting video with a DSLR.

Some folks like LCD loupes such as the example you have linked, others do not find them as useful. You would need to try one for yourself to see if it works for you. I would encourage you to find one with a more secure attachment system that uses the camera's tripod socket and allows adjustment for the differing dimensions of different camera models. Yes, they are more expensive, but they also have better optics with adjustable diopter power.

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    \$\begingroup\$ To add to this: This applies specifically to DSLRs. Mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras do not have this problem. You can use the viewfinder very well for shooting videos on those, this is just one of the many advantages they have. \$\endgroup\$
    – wonderbear
    Oct 20, 2022 at 7:18
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    \$\begingroup\$ @wonderbear The question was about a specific DSLR, The EOs 60D, not about mirrorless ILCs. Most of the advantages from using a MILC, as well as "advantages" touted by many that aren't considered such by many other photographers, can be duplicated by using a DSLR in Live View. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Oct 21, 2022 at 2:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MichaelC yes but not with the ancient 60D. Modern DSLRs have pixel PDAF or dual pixel PDAF so they're essentially the same as MILC, just bigger and heavier. That's not available on Canon 60D. Video recording using contrast AF is a bad idea in most cases, that's why almost no one does that anymore, most of videographers moved to MILC long ago \$\endgroup\$
    – phuclv
    Oct 21, 2022 at 16:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ @phuclv There are plenty of Canon DSLRs that do have dual pixel AF when using Live View that outperforms many MILCs when using AF while shooting video, too. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Oct 21, 2022 at 23:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MichaelC that comes down to the quality of the sensor and the AF algorithm. Regardless what I want to say is that video recording on a contrast AF cameras like 60D is mostly a bad idea. Anything that needs continuous AF should be done on a device with PDAF \$\endgroup\$
    – phuclv
    Oct 22, 2022 at 4:11
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A good pan-tilt head on a sturdy tripod would be my first choice for tracking live action using a screen.

Plus a lot of practice.

And maybe a larger sceen attached using a camera cage.

Basically a DSLR video rig.

Also, with a zoom lens zoom out to acquire the subject and then zoom in for the framing you want. Or just shoot wider and crop in post until you have enough practice.

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I have no idea if that item would work because I don't know how much lag that camera has over the real view.

A simple solution is to get a rangefinder that attaches to the hot shoe. Of course, that is an inexact way to frame, but I am guessing that you can make it work with some practice.

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=rangefinder+over+hotshoe

Most of what I have seen is like a vintage accessory. Probably you can even make some DIY thing or a 3D-printed one.

especially when you have a zoom lens

A zoom lens does not say anything meaningful; there are zoom lenses ultra-wide and there are telephoto zoom lenses. Of course, it is easier to frame using a wider lens.


If after making some tests, you find out that the lag of your screen is acceptable, the accessory you mention can work. I don't know if it fits perfectly, but could work.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks... rangefinder sounds interesting. \$\endgroup\$
    – xbmono
    Oct 20, 2022 at 3:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ Technically what you want here is called a sportfinder or viewfinder, viewfinders having lenses and sport finders being open air frames. Often they attach to the the accessory shoe as shown. At the cheap end a sport finder can be a simple 3d printed frame the size of the sensor with an eyehole the focal length behind it. A zoom lens is better done with a finder that has multiple fame lines for various focal lengths or an adjustable zoom/pupil location. At the more expensive end viewfinders with adjustable internal crop frames were made for Leica rangefinder cameras. \$\endgroup\$
    – davolfman
    Oct 20, 2022 at 23:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Although the rangefinder/viewfinder looks a good option but it seems not practical because the view angle won't match the lens angle, that aside, we don't see if the subject is in focus or not. Having said that, I decided to give that a go. \$\endgroup\$
    – xbmono
    Oct 25, 2022 at 0:57
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So I want to answer my own question and share what I ended up with.

I got PortKey LEYE viewfinder. It's currently (I believe) the most budget friendly EVF.

So far I've been using it and I have to say it helps a lot for video recording. My videos are way more smoother (not 100 percent stabilised though) but it's pleasantly smooth.

The best thing is that it can be powered with Canon batteries and since my camera is Canon I didn't need to buy new batteries. I also like the fact that it's not huge like the other options in the market. I really didn't want to look like a professional camera man who is filming an action movie :) so the size was very important for me too.

The screen isn't super clear and sometimes the diopter dial changes as you push your eyes against the viewfinder, the eye cap isn't great either.

But overall, considering the price and its function, it works great.

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