0
\$\begingroup\$

The EXIF orientation tag can hold 8 values for the orientation of the camera. One of the tag values 3, indicating that the camera was turned 180 degrees, i.e. held upside down.
However when I take a picture with the camera upside down, it shows the number 1 in the orientation tag, which means correct orientation. I would like to know if the photo has been shot upside down but the Canon camera doesn't write a value of 3 in the orientation tag but the value 1.

I've tried all three rotation options in the settings but I keep getting a value of 1 for the orientation tag. Is this something the Canon 80D/60D can not do?

\$\endgroup\$
6
  • \$\begingroup\$ With "I've tried all three rotation options", are you referring to the auto-rotation option mentioned on page 387 of the 80D manual? What happens when you take a photo in portrait mode? Does that change the orientation tag? And are you pointing your camera up/downwards when taking the photo? The manual states that this might prevent the auto-rotation from working. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 22, 2022 at 14:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ I confirm that like the OP if I use my Canon 70D upside down (keeping the lens axis roughly horizontal) the upside-down shot gets the same orientation Exif as the upright one, while portrait shots in both directions get adequate orientation tags. \$\endgroup\$
    – xenoid
    Aug 22, 2022 at 16:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ @xenoid I don't know how similar the 70D is to the 80D/60D, but perhaps then the answer is: these camera can't distinguish between upside down and right side up? \$\endgroup\$ Aug 23, 2022 at 11:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are three options in the settings menu for auto rotation. I've tried all three of them but that doesn't change the outcome \$\endgroup\$
    – Postie
    Aug 23, 2022 at 17:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ I do not understand why this is a problem that actual real-world users would ever have. Why would you ever hold a DSLR upside down? You would hold it rotated 90 degrees because you want a portrait aspect ratio, but upside down? I imagine that this is the reason why DSLR manufacturers don't implement something like this. \$\endgroup\$
    – wonderbear
    Jan 2, 2023 at 7:29

2 Answers 2

2
\$\begingroup\$

Tested with two other Canon cameras (70D and 450D) and both exhibit the same behavior:

  1. When used upside down (keeping the lens axis roughly horizontal) the upside-down shot gets the same orientation Exif as the upright one (and so so isn't straightened up on the camera display or in photo viewing apps)
  2. Portrait shots in both directions get adequate orientation tags

Evidence #2 suggest that the orientation sensor is working somewhat, so it is either a limitation of the sensor or a design decision....

Edit: further experimentation trying to delimit the range of the "false upwards" shows that this spans about 45° on each side, which is a rather wide angle and makes me suspect a design decision. And while checking this I found a possible explanation for the behavior: if you take a shot with the camera upside down the image is not straightened in the image review display, so it's upside-down in an upside-down camera, and therefore is upright and matches what you just shot.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, Canon DSLRs will always attempt to display the image on the rear LCD so that if the camera is held in the same orientation as when the image was captured the preview image will match the scene in front of the camera. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Aug 23, 2022 at 16:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ My guess is also that it's by design. I don't have other cameras to test with, so I have no idea if all cameras don't do this. Thanks for the great answer BTW \$\endgroup\$
    – Postie
    Aug 23, 2022 at 17:42
0
\$\begingroup\$

Canon DSLRs will always attempt to display the image on the rear LCD so that if the camera is held in the same orientation as when the image was captured the preview image will match the scene in front of the camera.

So it is a design decision to tag shots taken upside down with the same tag as shots with the camera held in the normal horizontal orientation.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ that's not really a good reason not to write the correct tag. the software in the camera could just decide to display tag 3 images like tag 1. \$\endgroup\$
    – ths
    Jan 2, 2023 at 13:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ths I didn't say it was a good reason, just that it's how Canon cameras do it... If you want to suggest that it's not a good reason, perhaps you could talk to the design team at Canon? \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Jan 4, 2023 at 0:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.