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Hasselblad cameras were used not only for the Apollo mission but also for the Shuttle. I found two images of Marsha Ivins taken 1992 and 1994 using multiple Hasselblad cameras.

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STS-46 Mission Specialist Ivins with HASSELBLAD cameras on OV-104 flight deck NASA ID: sts046-03-032 STS046-03-032 (31 July-8 Aug 1992) --- Astronaut Marsha S. Ivins, mission specialist, prepares to operate a tandem of 70mm Hasselblad cameras on the Space Shuttle Atlantis' aft flight deck. The cameras share a common mount, allowing for various tests to be run as the cameras record the same Earth-observations type imagery. Ivins was joined by four other NASA astronauts and two Europeans for an eight-day stay in Earth-orbit.

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Astronaut Marsha Ivins prepares to use three Hasselblad cameras together NASA ID: sts062-03-023 STS062-03-023 (4-14 March 1994) --- Astronaut Marsha S. Ivins, mission specialist, prepares to aim three Hasselblad cameras through the overhead windows of the earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. The three cameras were allowed to simultaneously record the same imagery on different types of file for purposes of comparison and experimentation.

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Space Shuttle Project NASA ID: 9802875 Astronaut Marsha S. Ivins, mission specialist, prepares to aim three Hasselblad cameras through the overhead windows of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Columbia. The three cameras were allowed to simultaneously record the same imagery on different types of film.

There are two versions of the 1994 image with different comment: different types of file and different types of film

So what types of cameras were used, analog or digital?

2 Answers 2

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The cameras used in 1992 and 1994 are all 70mm analog film cameras. 70mm refers to the film size, not the focal length of the lens.

Hasselblad did not make digital backs or digital cameras until much later.

When they say “file”, it is either a misprint, or they are referring to different types of film capture images.

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    I think it's quite obvious that "file" is just a typographical error
    – osullic
    Apr 7 at 12:51
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    There's also no reason to use different cameras to capture different files. Raw files can be converted to different formats as needed.
    – xiota
    Apr 8 at 1:32
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    @xiota there is more than RGB, especially in scientific imaging. Many sensors are not even RGB. So if they are using different sensors and or different filters (like IR or UV filters) than the best RAW won't help anything.
    – kruemi
    Apr 8 at 12:18
  • I'm aware, but then the caption would refer to different spectra, not "file".
    – xiota
    Apr 8 at 20:36
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This is an addition and not in competition to the accepted answer:

Given the similarity of the sentences, the word 'file' is a typographical error.

Also, in both the 1992 and the 1994 photos, the visible 'blads clearly have analogue backs attached, not digital.

So, in answer, the 'blads in these cases were analogue.

Note: Prior to Hasselblad selling their own backs circa 2004, some of their bodies were compatible with 3rd party digital backs, such as Kodak, Ixpress, Imacon, Phase One, Leaf, etc, and were sold as bundles for a time before Hasselblad offered their own in-house solution around 2007 when they locked out 3rd party backs.

So in 1994, medium format digital backs were available, and could have been used on some Hasselblads.

But whether they were used in this scenario is unlikely.

Early digital backs were unwieldy and in some cases required tethering to computers in order to work.

That said, the first digital backed-camera to go into space was a 35mm Nikon F4 with a back made by NASA, on STS-48 in 1991.

https://www.timmchapman.com/gallery/nasa-nikon-f4-electronic-still-camera/

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