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If I don't have access to a 200mm lens but I have a rather high resolution camera.

Does that mean if I zoom in 2x in my photo and half the mega pixel, I can achieve the same reach with a 100mm lens? Would the depth of field (DoF) be the same also (assuming both 2.8f)?

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If there is some dedicated "advanced" zoom in your camera - eg Sony "ClearImage", NOT plain "digital zoom" - try using it and see if you like the results.

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Note that focal length to crop equivalences are ONLY valid when the crop is from the center of the image (optical center of the lens used is in the center of the crop) OR for dead flat subject matter. Anything else will give subtle to gross perspective differences.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Perspective differences are a result of changes in camera position. Period. If the optical center (i.e. the "no parallex point") of each respective lens is in the same, the perspective will be identical. Geometric distortions due to the differences in lens projection are NOT perspective differences, they're differences in lens projection and/or in magnification variability across the field (that is, the focal length in the center of the field is slightly different that the focal length on the edge or corner). But those have nothing to do with perspective. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Feb 2, 2022 at 7:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please see: What is the difference between perspective distortion and barrel or pincushion distortion? \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Feb 2, 2022 at 7:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MichaelC "no parallax point" == "crop from the center"? ...edited to clarify. But yes, I assumed a question asking about "half the mega pixel" (sic) can and should be answered in an informal way (perspective as anything that makes things unstraight in the picture) :) \$\endgroup\$ Feb 2, 2022 at 16:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ "makes things unstraight in the picture." That's not perspective, that's lens projection and geometric distortion. Those have nothing to do with the relative positions of the camera and the subject(s), and the relative position of various objects in the scene, which is what perspective is about. \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Feb 5, 2022 at 3:26

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