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I bought this battery charger in the US (110 V 60 Hz) for my Canon T5 Rebel. I'm now living in Sweden (220 V 50 Hz).

Will my charger work on the Swedish power grid without breaking? The issue is, there are two different voltage ranges listed on the back of the charger.

Canon battery charger

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    Not worthy of an answer of its own, but the 2 certification marks are for Japan, [PSE] & the US [CULUS]. I didn't dig into the depths of each certification method, but it's reasonable to assume the Japanese one is intended for international & the US only for domestic, to tick the 'safety' boxes for each territory. The manual says basically 'use a plug adaptor for abroad' nothing more, ie, no voltage transformer needed.
    – Tetsujin
    Dec 31, 2021 at 8:51
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    @Tetsujin Actually, as the OP is specifically confused by the two voltage ranges, your comment deserves being converted to an answer. Dec 31, 2021 at 11:40
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    @HagenvonEitzen - OK, will do. :)
    – Tetsujin
    Dec 31, 2021 at 11:59
  • What does the user manual of the charger (or of the camera if it was included in a package with a camera) say? The marks on the back are certification marks for agencies in different countries, not instructions for use.
    – Michael C
    Jan 1 at 12:25
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    @MichaelC - the manual says use an adapter, not a voltage converter. Relevant segment & link added to my answer.
    – Tetsujin
    Jan 2 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

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I can only surmise that the potential confusion comes from the two apparently conflicting certification marks.

The first is for Japan, [PSE] & 2nd the US [CULUS]. I didn't dig into the depths of each certification method, but it's reasonable to assume the Japanese one is intended for international & the US only for domestic, to tick the 'safety' boxes for each territory.

The manual says basically 'use a plug adaptor for abroad', no voltage transformer needed. Any 'tourist/travel adapter' plug converter will be fine. There's no Earth on devices such as these, as they're classed as 'double insulated' so it will go in any socket, any way up.

From the manual - page 31

The battery charger can also be used in foreign countries.
The battery charger is compatible with a 100 V AC to 240 V AC 50/ 60 Hz power source. If necessary, attach a commercially-available plug adapter for the respective country or region. Do not attach any portable voltage transformer to the battery charger. Doing so can damage the battery charger.

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The label says it is compatible from 100V to 240V, 50 or 60 Hz. Thus, a 230V (perhaps 220V) 50Hz mains, as found in Sweden, will work fine with this charger. You'll need to adapt the U.S. plug style to the style found in the EU.

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    The OP's problem is that there is another indication on the label, only stating 100-120V. You stopped at the first box... :-)
    – Gábor
    Dec 31, 2021 at 22:16
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    @Gábor See Tetsujin's answer above. The 100-120V rating shows that it is C-UL-US listed which means it met the requirements for the U.S.A. and Canada (UL & CSA). The 100V-240V rating is PSE listed which is a Japanese certification for the Japanese market. Bottom line, this is a wide-input charger which can be used in the Japanese (100V) to U.K. (the old UK voltage was 240V, now 230V to harmonize the voltage between the UK and continental Europe) markets, i.e., any voltage between 100V to 240V.
    – qrk
    Jan 1 at 8:36
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    CSA? It meets their standards, but isn't it only tested by Underwriters Laboratories in this case? Not by CSA themselves per se. UL probably only tested 100-120 because that is the main outlet type in the US and Canada (though we do have up to 240, it is typically reserved for only a few appliances, e.g. oven). Aren't these the CSA marks: csagroup.org/testing-certification/marks-labels/…
    – ttbek
    Jan 2 at 12:14
  • @ttbek The C-UL-US means it meets requirements for the North American market, i.e., Canada and the U.S. There is a C-UL mark that is for the Canadian market, but tested in a UL lab. There's a C-CSA-US mark for the North American market certified at a CSA lab. Lots of variations.
    – qrk
    Jan 2 at 19:20

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