0
\$\begingroup\$

I put separate red, green, and blue led ring collars on my dog. Visually my eyes see each color and collar. A photograph, however, shows only a blur of white light. What causes this?

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Hard to tell without seeing the actual photograph. \$\endgroup\$ Dec 22, 2021 at 9:34

2 Answers 2

0
\$\begingroup\$

Color Vision: Experiment after experiment reveals that most colors found in nature can be replicate by blending various proportions of red, green, and blue light.

These three colors are labeled the light primary colors. Further, the use of these light primary colors forms the bases of color photography. We are talking chemical-based film and digital photography.

An absence of red, green, and blue yields black. Mixing red, green, and blue light in equal proportions yields white. Turning off only the red lamp yields red’s complement (opposite) which is cyan. Likewise, the complement of green is magenta. The complement of blue is yellow.

The camera captures color images by independently fracturing a vista into its red, green, and blue components. This is accomplished in the digital camera by the placement of red, green, and blue filters on the digital sensor. A red filter passes red light and blocks green and blue. A green filter passes green light while blocking red and blue. A blue filter passes blue light and blocks red and green. In this way, the digital camera separately records three images of the subject, one for each of the light primary colors. These three images are further manipulated by the camera’s software.

To view, the display method presents a red, green and blue image vial glowing dot (pixels -- short for picture element). In the case of images on paper (prints), these are presented using an ink or piment dot method using the compliment colors which are cyan, magenta, and yellow.

Your dog’s induvial red, green and blue collars likely somehow reproduced as a blend of the three light primary colors. Likely this happened as a result of several typical photo eccentricities.

Bright objects often reproduce encircled by flare light. Additionally, due to subject movement or focus inadequacies, the collar images comingled. In other words, some characteristic of the imagining chain of events caused the red, green, and blue to blend resulting in a breeding of colors that yielded a white image.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Without further information it's tough to say, but the two things that came to mind were:

  • You are shooting a collar that has a retro reflective strip, an so from the camera's view (if you're using a flash) you'll only see a blur of white reflected back
  • The LED is over-saturating the image at that point.
\$\endgroup\$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.