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For use in other tools I want to write in Lightroom Classic to a photo's keywords if a photo is part of a stack, but not on top of a stack.

For this the easiest would be to create filter which shows exactly that: all photos which are part of a stack, but not on top of a stack. (Then I would just apply a keyword to all of these photos.)

I tried get something with LightRoom’s filter bar, but counld’t find any attribute pertaining to stacks. I did find a 3rd Party plugin (John R. Ellis' Any Filter), but is that the only option? And if so, does it work reliably?

If that's not possible, it would still work to show all photos at all which are part of stack (on top or not), it just would be importat to ommit all photos which aren't in any stack. (Then I could still do the keyword applying when combined with some stack expanding/collapsing.)

How can I do this in LR Classic?

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  • Have you looked into any websearch results on this topic? I ask this to prevent that someone suggests something that you've tried before and which didn't work in the end. If you tried something (which didn't work, otherwise you wouldn't be asking) please include that in the question, it helps formulating a helpful answer. Sep 16 at 9:55
  • @SaaruLindestøkke I tried everything in LightRoom’s filter bar. But could’t find any filter attribute pertaining to stacks. Will add this to the question.
    – halloleo
    Sep 16 at 10:41
  • Ah ok, I understand. But you didn't do a websearch for something like "lightroom filter stack"? I just want to make sure that it's clear what you found with your own research, such that answers don't suggest something unhelpful. Sep 16 at 10:47
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John Ellies mentions on lightroomqueen.com an embarrassingly simple way how to do it natively in LR:

  1. Select a folder, collection, or All Photographs.

  2. Do Photo > Stacking > Collapse All Stacks.

  3. Do Edit > Select All.

  4. Do Photo > Stacking > Expand All Stacks.

  5. Do Edit > Invert Selection.

That's it. Now you have selected all photos which are part of a stack, but not on top of a stack.

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