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I'm learning the basics of photography and I am wondering if the "Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L" will fit my Canon 250D (SL3) camera? I searched online but was unable to find anything clear.

My main concern is that I purchase a lens that is too advanced for my entry level camera. I heard that crop sensors cameras don't work with some type of lenses. Is there another option better-suited to the SL3?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Have you tried using the 18-55mm lens that came with your camera? It should work well enough to start learning food photography. When you gain some experience, you will have a better idea of which lens best suits your style of photography. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 17, 2021 at 11:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MikeSowsun yes, there was some noise in the results, but maybe it was my fault. I will try again. \$\endgroup\$
    – shadeed9
    Aug 23, 2021 at 6:44

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All EF lenses manufactured since 1987 will work on all EF mount EOS SLR cameras made by Canon since 1987 when the EOS system was introduced.

This includes all film EOS SLR cameras and all digital EOS SLR cameras including all DSLR models with full frame, APS-H, and APS-C size sensors.

EF-S lenses will only work on EOS DSLR cameras with APS-C sized sensors. Since your EOS Rebel SL3/250D has an APS-C size sensor, it can use every single EF and EF-S lens Canon has ever made. Every.Single.One.

Whether the EF 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro is the best choice for your purposes is another question.

The EF 100mm f/2.8L IS Macro is a bit more expensive than the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro. Optically they perform very similarly. The advantage of the "L" lens is mainly that is has image stabilization (IS) and a higher level of build quality. If you're going to be using a tripod (as you almost certainly should for product/food photography), then you'd be paying for IS that you don't need, since you'll turn it off when using a tripod. Unless you're going to put the lens through a meat grinder day in and day out in all kinds of shooting conditions (weather, industrial settings, steamy kitchens, etc.), for you the build quality probably won't be something worth paying extra for, either.

If by "food photography" you mean taking pictures of your plate before you eat in a restaurant's dining room during the restaurant's normal operating hours, then 100mm will be entirely too long for that unless the people at the table next to yours don't mind you standing on top of their table to frame your plate with an APS-C camera. You'd be better served by something that includes focal lengths in the 18mm to 35mm range.

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The Canon EOS 250D (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS_250D) has a combined EF/EF-S mount. This means that you can use all EF lenses and all EF-S lenses and using the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L should not be a problem.

But, as EOS 250D has an APS-C sensor, the effective focal length will be multiplied by 1.6, meaning that the 100MM lens will effectively look like a 160mm lens, when used on the EOS 250D.

I how no real experience with food photography, so I can't tell exactly which lens to buy, but if you are just starting up and trying to figure out which focal lenght suits your style best, then perhaps a Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM or similar would be a better choice, as it will more generally usable. This lens does require a bit more light though, as it is f/4 instead of f/2.8.

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It will work, but will require to be quite far (about two meters to include a whole plate) because on your camera it is 3-4x "stronger" that the "natural" focal length (28-35mm).

There is a 60mm EF-S macro which can be better suited, as well as a 35mm EF-S macro, but if you are shooting whole plates you are far enough to use a non-macro lens.

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Algorithm:

  • look up which lens mount the camera has (250D has EF / EF-S; they are two slightly different but you can use lens with either mount on this camera).
  • look up which mount the lens has. It's EF as you can see directly from lens name.

So the lens fits the camera.

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