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I know the lifespan of DSLR largely depends on the shutter count. But I want to know how does the lifespan of DSLR is affected when the shutter is replaced. If we install fresh new shutter in a used DLSR does this mean we can expect double life under normal using conditions, given that there is no other failures in the system.

Does the sensor life depends on shutter count? or can we expect to use camera according to new shutter life?

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    Finding a second-hand camera with a low shutter count is possibly going to be less expensive than having the shutter replaced.
    – xenoid
    Jul 27 at 0:31
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    @xenoid well I found deals where a DSLR with lower shutter count is lot more expensive. Like a Nikon D750 with higher shutter count is for $500 but with a lower shutter count is more than $1100. I checked the cost of replacing a new shutter is $300 - $400 approx.
    – Rajendra V
    Jul 27 at 19:17
  • What is the shutter count of the less expensive unit and how much do you expect to use it? Jul 28 at 4:36
  • @LightBender one of them has shutter count of 145,000 for $500. That I planning to have shutter replaced by Nikon if I see any issues with it. But the one with low shutter count of 55,000 is for $1500. I intent to use it for 1-2 year for occasional photography for trips. And if plan to buy newer/better full frame later.
    – Rajendra V
    Jul 28 at 18:04
  • I can't directly advise you on this because you are essentially taking a gamble here. I can only help articulate the risk. There is no guarantee that the shutter will fail at 150k, I've owned workhorse cameras I've gone nearly double the shutter life on, and had some fail 10% past the mark. So ultimately, it's up to you if you feel the risk is worth the reward. Don't just consider the money though, will your current equipment hold you until you are ready to replace? What does it cost you (personally) if the equipment fails in the field? All things to consider. Jul 28 at 21:34
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The shutter mechanism is one of the few mechanical components on a DSLR(other than hinges, seals, buttons, dials). The Shutter mechanism is the second most complicated part of a DSLR after than the sensor. If replaced properly, by the authorised service centre, It will almost breathe new life into your DSLR. Do not worry about the technological obsolescence of your DSLR.

Based on your name, I am assuming you are from India. So, in India, finding a good used DSLR(better model than the one you have) with low shutter count is going to be far more expensive than just replacing the shutter mechanism. As long as the main and command dials and D-Pad are working fine, replacing your shutter is going to almost renew the life of your camera. The sensor does not wear out(unless you are doing astro-photography and star trails, in which case hotspots and burnt pixels become far more common and you can consider the sensor to be wearing out).

Look at pro tog cheap camera challenge by DRTV. You don't need the latest and greatest DSLR for great pics but your DSLR definitely needs a shutter to be able to take pics.

So, I would say If your DSLR shutter life has reached the rated life, GET IT REPLACED IMMEDIATELY. There is no need to go out and buy a new camera but get it replaced ASAP. a torn shutter/broken mechanism can damage the sensor which will be a real nightmare(DSLR is rendered useless, resale value will crash making it even more difficult for you to upgrade if you want to/need to).

YOU CAN EXPECT TO SUE THE CAMERA CLOSE TO THE NEW SHUTTER's LIFE(depends on the condition of the dials and buttons).

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  • Thank you for the feedback. I am not in india. I am just a hobbyist and blog my photos. I am talking about Nikon D750 with slightly higher shutter count but in good condition for $500. I know after sometime if shutter fails I can replace it for approx $300-$400. I do want to spend significant amount to buy latest camera just to make it perfect. For a lesser shutter count I can get same camera for $1100 - $1400.
    – Rajendra V
    Jul 27 at 19:54
  • I would never replace a shutter assembly simply because it had reached its rated number of actuations. It's very rare for a shutter to suffer catastrophic failure without giving smaller warning signs first. Some of those would include a slow second curtain (so that the top of the frame/bottom of the sensor is progressively exposed brighter near the top edge), a "sticky" shutter curtain that never completely closes, or maybe even this obvious gap where one of the blades in the curtain is gone.
    – Michael C
    Jul 30 at 7:22
  • @Rajendra V I would say the Nikon D750 is a pretty good camera and can hold it's own even in today's landscape. Unless you are looking for video capabilities, in which case I'd say go for Nikon Z. IMHO, You can later spend the $300-$600 you save on something more useful. Like lenses or an upgraded tripod or camera bag or GND filter set or macro extension tube set or bellows or Speedlight system. Or even a second body as backup. You could also buy a dehumidifying cabinet if you live near the coast. Jul 31 at 8:40
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Replacing a failing shutter will usually lengthen the useful life of a camera.

But the useful life of most DSLR's is less defined by mechanical failure and more by technical obsolescence. Most DSLR's are replaced by something better because digital technology improves every few years. Also because most cameras are sold at the lower tiers there are potential upgrades from day one.

The cameras that don't get upgraded tend to be those owned by people who take fewer pictures and never approach the limits of their shutter's mechanical durability.

Personally, I would assume a used camera with a shutter count that significantly exceeds the rated life of the shutter is for sale because the shutter is failing. For a high shutter count camera below rating, I wouldn't worry much. For one just over the rated life, I would assume that someone is upgrading and using shutter count as a rationale.

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    I'd argue against the fact that the useful life of a DSLR or any digital camera depends on technical obsolescence. Although cameras are still improving, any modern high end camera will produce great results. A camera does not become useless when the next model is released. When the shutter fails, however, it becomes significantly harder to take photos.
    – timvrhn
    Jul 27 at 10:50
  • @timvrhn I don’t disagree Older cameras are perfectly capable of great pictures. But shopping is easier than making great pictures and new gear is a way of convincing people (including yourself) that one’s a serious photographer. But besides that new DSLR’s are better…the Nikon F5 film camera is still about as good as it gets. It’s digital stablemate, the D1 is as obsolescent as an iMac G3. To put it another way, there are good reasons to buy or use an older DSLR. But there are good reasons to replace an old but full operational DSLR with a later model and most people do that. Jul 27 at 15:58
  • Cameras are used for more than making pictures. For example they are, as these comments prove, useful for arguments on the internet. Jul 27 at 16:00
  • @BobMacaroniMcStevens " But shopping is easier than making great pictures and new gear is a way of convincing people (including yourself) that one’s a serious photographer " I think you are ignoring the price aspect. People's budgets are very different from each other. With your budget capability, it might be worth it to discard older cameras when better cameras come on to the market. But there are many people, for whom technical obsolescence is acceptable . They want to keep using their older cameras for long, even if better cameras come into the market, rather than spending on new one. Jul 27 at 18:03
  • @BobMacaroniMcStevens I am just a hobbyist and blog my photos. I am talking about Nikon D750 with slightly higher shutter count but in good condition for $500. I know after sometime if shutter fails I can replace it for approx $300-$400. I do want to spend significant amount to buy latest camera just to make it perfect. For a lesser shutter count I can get same camera for $1100 - $1400.
    – Rajendra V
    Jul 27 at 19:25

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