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I received my developed pictures and many of them are foggy. It seems that some shot with similar light is foggier than the others. Can it be that something went wrong in the development process, is it because they tried to compensate for the lack of light, or did I set the camera wrong?

Any ideas how I can fix it? enter image description here

Cheers!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Did you set the camera wrong? Well, how did you set it?! What camera is it? \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Feb 12, 2021 at 10:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Film does not work fantastically well in low light situations. Even if your (very adaptable) human eyes think an indoor scene is reasonably bright, it probably isn't all that bright. Film works at its very best outdoors in daylight. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Feb 12, 2021 at 10:47

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It looks like your example was severely underexposed. When the negative was scanned or a print was made from the negative there was an attempt to brighten the image to give you something more than a totally black frame.

For exposures longer than one second or so, don't forget to account for the Schwarzschild effect, sometimes referred to as reciprocity failure. The sensitivity of films at longer exposure times is not linear. This can very significantly impact exposure times, and it varies by the specific film in question. The manufacturer's data sheet of your film should provide information regarding how much compensation is needed for longer exposures.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks a lot!🙏 \$\endgroup\$
    – daniel42
    Feb 12, 2021 at 12:33

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