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Recently I found 3 unprocessed film rolls like this one:

enter image description here

Can I extract the films from the rolls and scan them using some app like KODAK Mobile Film Scanner?

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    \$\begingroup\$ May I ask... if you think that it could be possible to skip the processing step, what do you think the processing step does? \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Sep 15, 2020 at 14:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ "negative digitalization apps" Seems dubious, perhaps for a cheap way to see whats on the negatives or for trashing photos with "the trendy filter of the day on the internet" but if you want quality scans then a lab with a quality scanner should be used. Yes, i am a curmudgeon. \$\endgroup\$
    – Alaska Man
    Sep 16, 2020 at 20:34

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While in the roll the film is still light sensitive, so if you removed the film and exposed it to light the images probably would be destroyed (as the film would be over exposed). The film needs to be developed (chemical process that both makes the image visible and turns off the light sensitivity of the film) before it can be scanned. There are still labs that can do the development, just a matter of finding one near you (or one you can mail the film to).

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    \$\begingroup\$ Not "probably would be destroyed".... "will be destroyed". \$\endgroup\$
    – twalberg
    Sep 15, 2020 at 14:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Cool! I'll try to find a lab. Thank you! \$\endgroup\$
    – Caconde
    Sep 15, 2020 at 14:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ For clarity sake: "exposed it to light the images probably would be destroyed" There are NO images on the film until it is processed. The emulsion was exposed but no image is on the emulsion/film until the emulsion is developed with the proper chemistry, then the development must be stopped with the stop bath chemistry and the image fixed, made permanent, with the fixer chemistry. \$\endgroup\$
    – Alaska Man
    Sep 16, 2020 at 20:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ @AlaskaMan, There are images on the film. We call them latent images. You can't see them, and they'll be obliterated if the film is exposed light, but they are real. They are as real as any digital image, which also happens to be a thing that you can not see. "Development" is what we call the chemical process that turns latent images into more-or-less permanent, visible images. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 17, 2020 at 12:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ It would be interesting whether one could indeed sense the latent image and digitally enhance it into something useful. Most likely NOT possible with onboard hardware of a normal cellphone or computer. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 30, 2020 at 5:17
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A footnote in history: In 1995, Applied Science Fiction Inc. of Austin Texas was acquired by Eastman Kodak. This firm developed automatic photo restoration software, Digital ICE and Digital ICE3. Environmental concerns revolving around the handling, storage, and discarding of the chemicals of the photo developing process, were peaking. ASF built an apparatus that dampened unprocessed color film with a reagent. The latent image was transformed into a meager visual image. A unique scanner with exclusive software digitized the moist film generating a full color digitized image. The film was discarded, replaced by a DVD. Field trials proved this to be viable concept. However the digital photo era had arisen and this project was abandoned.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi Alan, can you provide a link to the device that you're referring to? Digital ICE is a technology that uses an infrared light source to detect dust and scratches on film, when scanned in a (conventional) film scanner equipped with the technology. Associated software uses the information from the infrared channel to digitally remove the dust and scratches from the scanned image, without affecting the image itself. The currently-available Epson V600 and V850 scanners include Digital ICE. \$\endgroup\$
    – osullic
    Sep 15, 2020 at 16:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ This device was a film machine / scanner / printer. It misted the film with a single chemical reagent. This partially developed the color negative film. A scanner made multiple passes with filtered white and IR scans. Software gathered red, green, and blue image data. A digital file was created and prints made via inkjet or dye sublimation. This device did a reasonable job. The film was trashed. The idea was no chemicals discharged to the drain. You can find patent on the web. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 15, 2020 at 18:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ patents.google.com/patent/US6017688A/en \$\endgroup\$ Sep 15, 2020 at 18:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ I remember reading about this back in the day. The general reception from potential customers was mostly negative because they wouldn't get their developed film back with the digital images. (See what I did there?) \$\endgroup\$
    – Michael C
    Sep 15, 2020 at 23:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ What did you do? \$\endgroup\$ Sep 16, 2020 at 0:02
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Develop the film. Scan the film with a proper scanner or ask the lab to do it. Note: The film emulsion might peel and flake off during processing if the roll is very old. The lab may insist that it be developed at the end of their day. That way, if it disintegrates, it won't ruin anyone else's film.

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