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I have a Flashpoint R2 Pro II transmitter, a TT350 flash, and a Fuji X-H1. When I use the flash at its least powerful setting (1/16, under HSS) on the camera at 1/2000, f/4.5, and iso 100, it works fine/exposes correctly. As soon as I pull it off and use the R2 Pro II transmitter, while keeping it at 1/16 power, all the pictures I take are dark/underexposed.

Here are a couple pictures of the flash settings and example of darker photos: https://imgur.com/a/AzJd5Qj

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    Is the lens you are using a 70mm lens? A 45-50mm lens? Something else? Flash zoom settings should be adjusted to "equivalent focal length" because the critical thing is actually angle of view, not focal length.
    – Michael C
    Aug 14, 2020 at 6:57
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    Does that only occur when you are using HSS? Aug 14, 2020 at 7:18

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It looks to me like the flash is pointed straight at the mirror when attached to your camera and may be pointed up at an angle when you are holding it in your hand.

Rather than trying to compare flash brightness by a reflection in a mirror that is very sensitive to the angle of the flash's beam, have you tried using it to illuminate a subject that does not include the flash itself?

Another thing you might want to look at is the focal length of the lens you are using versus the "Auto" setting on the flash (when attached directly to the hot shoe) versus "70mm" when controlled by the R2.

Is the lens you are using a 70mm lens? A 45-50mm lens? Something else? Flash zoom settings should be adjusted to "equivalent focal length" because the critical thing is actually angle of view, not focal length. Flash zoom setting affects the size of the cone of light projected by the lens, which in turn affects the density of light per unit area.

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  • that was just for demo purposes, it was at 90 every time i've tried it, in manual mode, with the same flash zoom, and same lens Aug 14, 2020 at 8:29
  • It may be at 90° to itself, but if you're hand holding it then it may not be in alignment with your camera.
    – Michael C
    Aug 14, 2020 at 14:26
  • What about focal length? What lens were you using? Your flash zoom settings are different on the flash itself and on the transmitter.
    – Michael C
    Aug 14, 2020 at 14:28
  • i set the flash zoom settings to the same thing or put the flash in auto which lets me adjust it from the transmitter. I tested it when sitting right next to the transmitter, at the exact same angle it would be at if it were on the hotshoe. basically moved over 3 inches. The zoom setting staying the same off and on hotshoe means the focal length doesn't matter, the two photos should be the same level of bright. Aug 14, 2020 at 16:20
  • When the flash zoom setting is in "Auto" with the flash directly connected to the camera's hot shoe, how are you controlling the flash's zoom head with the transmitter? How do you confirm that the flash's zoom head was at the same position in each photo? That info is not included in the EXIF info of any camera I've ever looked at, not even in the 'maker notes' section of the EXIF info.
    – Michael C
    Aug 14, 2020 at 16:24
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1/2000s of exposure time will give most remote flash triggers a run for their money. I recommend using a reasonably dark environment for testing (pretty much anything but sunshine should do) and putting exposure time significantly up, then dialing it down until stuff stops working as expected.

Does the flash trigger guarantee to work with HSS for off-camera flash? Some flash triggers stating to support various flash functions only do it for a flash immediately mounted on the trigger itself (basically, they do pass-through for the flash contact arrangement of the system they claim to support, but don't interpret the signals on their own).

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