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I noticed something that probably is good but looks bad in my opinion.

I pixel peeped an image to compare the Jpeg vs Tiff. Both are exported with Lightroom from a raw file. I only changed the file type between the two exports. I know jpeg is set to max quality. I didn't see any settings, or didn't notice any that needed to be changed on the Tiff.

Looking at the dress on the inside where the black horizontal line is the jpeg shows a smooth skin, where as the tiff is more jagged.
Is this because it's higher quality?

Full size images:
Jpeg: http://hoppvader.nu/bilder/IMG_3209-3.jpg (10 MB)
Tiff: http://hoppvader.nu/bilder/IMG_3209.tif (92 MB)

I have tried to get the same "composition" on the two images and took a screen capture of it.

Jpeg:
jpeg screenshot

Tiff:
tiff screenshot

For reference this is the full image, I understand we are looking at a tiny part of the image:
full image

I noticed the Tif is cropped slightly so I took the Jpeg that is also cropped the same way. Nothing else is changed, no extra editing is done.

Export settings TIF:
tiff export settings

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  • Both are exported with Lightroom from a raw file. I only changed the file type between the two exports. I know jpeg is set to max quality. I didn't see any settings, or didn't notice any that needed to be changed on the Tiff. I can't answer for sure right now as I'm putting my son to bed now. @xiota
    – Andreas
    Jun 20 '20 at 17:58
  • One thing that JPEG compression can do is, on an 8x8 pixel block basis, slightly smooth out the variations within that block, but usually at the expense of creating greater variation at the edges between blocks, especially the lower the quality setting goes. This could be a case of several fairly uniform blocks being smoothed a bit more by the compression/quantization steps...
    – twalberg
    Jun 20 '20 at 18:01
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The differences you see are caused by different interpolation algorithms used by the viewers you're using when showing images at greater than 100% magnification. Some interpolation algorithms have a smoothing effect (bicubic), while others can cause aliasing (bilinear, nearest neighbor).

The images are also displayed with slightly different magnification, which can be seen with difference layer blending. Notice that when the left side of the images line up, the right side is mismatched.

screenshot difference

There is no significant difference between the source JPEG and TIFF. As can be seen from the file sizes (10MB vs 90MB), JPEG is more suitable for sharing, while 16-bit TIFF contain additional color information that may be useful when extensive editing is required.

Here are 100% crops from the JPG and TIFF (saved as PNG), along with the result of difference layer blending.

crop jpeg crop tiff crop diff

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  • I see what you are saying but it's quite hard to get them the same magnification in different viewers. And then using the doing the screen capture by hand on a laptop touch pad made it even harder. But I will upload the images as soon as I'm free
    – Andreas
    Jun 20 '20 at 18:05
  • 1
    Thank you! I will have a look at it when I'm at the computer since I can't see nothing on the phone...
    – Andreas
    Jun 20 '20 at 20:25

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