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To start off I'm totally new to Astrophotography. So I got a old camera from my grandpa.

its the Canon EOS 50D. with as lens the: CANON EF-S 18-200MM IS F/3.5-5.6

But I'm not sure how capable it is for the job.

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It's entirely a matter of opinion whether it's "good enough". Using a simple point-and-shoot camera on time-lapse and manual settings, I've made a video of a lunar eclipse that satisfied me and that others found interesting. It did not rival photos from the University of Toronto dragonfly array, though.

Use what you have, learn how to make images and to improve your technique, and then, if you desire, try other equipment. "Technique, technique, technique."

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If you are planning on doing serious astrophotography I suggest using a good prime lens instead of a zoom. Corner sharpness and chroma control are very important. Also, read all the guides you can find and be prepared to purchase stacking software.

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