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I've seen some conflicting information on similar questions. I'm working with Lightroom and its lens correction option - I also have the in-camera lens correction option enabled. Does the in-camera correction apply to images shot in raw format before exporting them from the camera?

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The reason Lens Correction exists in processing software is that RAW is raw (as the name implies). Contrary to JPG, a RAW is not meant to be displayed but rather processed. See this informative topic for further thought on the nature of a RAW.

To allow viewing the content of a RAW, most camera manufacturer embed a JPEG preview in the RAW file. That JPEG preview can contain in-camera lens correction along with WB, color profile... Which can differ from the processing software lens correction setting.

To scramble the eggs further, in processing software, sometimes the software shows the photo as the embedded JPEG preview, sometimes it processes a JPEG from the RAW itself with settings corresponding more or less to your camera and lens combination. That's why people have trouble figuring out what is what.

Of course, once you start processing the RAW file you should see the processing effect on the RAW file; software lens correction if activated.

To sum it up, in-camera lens correction is for in-camera JPEG only (embedded with the RAW or standalone). Software processing lens correction is for the RAW data itself and will appear in software processed JPEG only.

You can try it yourself by shooting RAW + JPEG in camera and then processing the RAW in software to render another JPEG. Compare both JPEGs to see the differences.

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    Agreed, it sounds confusing now that you said it. The difference I wanted to enforce is that JPG is binary information ready for display and the RAW is binary information for processing purpose : it's not meant to be displayed. – jihems Nov 20 '19 at 15:49
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I'm working with Lightroom and its lens correction option - I also have the in-camera lens correction option enabled. Does the in-camera correction apply to images shot in raw format before exporting them from the camera?

There is no need to be concerned about the possibility of applying lens correction twice. Although some "raw" formats do not contain entirely unprocessed sensor data, they are sufficiently minimally processed that lens corrections are not applied to the data that raw processors use.

The preview image often does have lens correction applied. Some programs compare the raw data with the preview image to attempt to obtain settings that match what the camera produced.

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