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I’m a beginner to LR, I’ve got a preset (applied on the right) and I’m trying to replicate the vintagy effect. I was wondering what setting this is? I don’t even know what that’s called so advice on both would be very much appreciated!

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  • For a good part is is reducing the color saturation. – xenoid Sep 28 '19 at 13:28
  • Actually, the right photo looks like it has an irritating level of veiling glare.... – rackandboneman Sep 28 '19 at 17:15
  • What preset did you apply? – xiota Sep 28 '19 at 18:39
  • Thanks for you’re comments guys! I don’t want to completely replicate it but I would like to be able to play with it a bit. I believe it was called “sex magik”. – Laura-Jane James Sep 28 '19 at 22:41
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    Could you please describe the specific effect you're looking for in this question's title? That will help you get better answers. – Please Read My Profile Sep 29 '19 at 4:30
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It's not perfect - I couldn't look at both as I was tweaking the one on the left - but in Photoshop (I don't use LR but I assume the editors are similar) I first of all reduced Contrast & Dehaze to get the rough 'shape' of the changes [& which I think are the key elements of the structure], then basically just twiddled with the tone curve after that. I also pulled the white balance towards green, to try get what had been done to the white paint in the background.

The 'veiling glare' mentioned in comments is actually easily generated using Dehaze at negative values.

This is what I ended up with & the Photoshop CameraRAW pallets to achieve it below.
It didn't actually need any desaturation, though I had initially thought it would.

enter image description here

enter image description here enter image description here

Doing this type of task does reveal a weakness in Camera RAW, though - you can't go back in & just 'tweak a bit more from where you left off', as the palette resets to zeros. You have to either start over, or your palette doesn't show exactly what you did. It's not additive in that way, for 'educational' purposes.
That's why I gave up at this point rather than get the last tweak just so.

From comments:
Though I did the colour-shift using just the white balance, the original may have done it using split-toning instead - Digital Photography School: How to Use Split Toning to Make Your Photos Stand Out. I did have a quick look at doing it that way, but couldn't then do the entire tweak in one single pass so I could show the editing palettes in my answer.

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    Wow!!! I was never expecting something so in-depth but this is perfect and it’s going to help so much in my learning journey! Thank you so much for taking the time out of your day to do this! It’s so appreciated! :D – Laura-Jane James Sep 29 '19 at 10:35
  • Welcome. One other thing: though I did the colour-shift using just the white balance, the original may have done it using split-toning instead - fairly random google for a teaching page. I did have a quick look at doing it that way, but couldn't then do the entire tweak in one single pass so I could show the editing palettes in my answer. – Tetsujin Sep 29 '19 at 11:27
  • Thank you so much! I’ll be having a play around with it this evening, il let you know how I get on. – Laura-Jane James Sep 29 '19 at 15:04
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It looks to me like the input black point was lowered. This has the effect of making the darkest parts of the image lighter. There are a few ways to achieve this. You can either use the curves tool and simply move the point in the lower left directly upwards, or you could use the levels tool and raise the output black point, or lower the input black point below 0.

It also looks like they may have desaturated the image a little bit. To do that, just set the Saturation slider to a lower value.

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