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I want to recreate some food photography images but I can't determine the size of the tableware used in the images. I'm assuming there are people here who can read images better than me so I want to have your opinion on whether the tableware used in following images are plates or side plates based on the size approximate to the food, fork, and spoon you might find in the images.

image 1

image 2

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    The lemons and limes are the key... – Pete Becker Aug 20 '19 at 22:03
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is about guessing the size of food, not photography. – Please Read My Profile Aug 20 '19 at 22:22
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    This is about product photography - food - in this case. To say it is off topic misses an opportunity to pull studio photography/product photography in into proper perspective insofar as the scope of photography. It's as on topic as any specialty from landscape to portrait. – Stan Aug 21 '19 at 3:09
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    I'd be much more comfortable with a question that asks how to select a plate size for food photography. IMO that would give answerers an opportunity to talk about how to approach taking a photograph, rather than about how to measure the size of something in someone else's photograph. – Michael C Aug 21 '19 at 4:45
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    The objective of the shoot I'm creating is to have the plate inside the scene so it shouldn't be cropped which has led me to the conclusion that the bigger the plate, the smaller the food inside the plate will seem to the eye. In the photos I have attached in the original question, the food inside the plate seems larger than what I've been able to achieve in my own shooting, so I want to know first if my conclusion makes any sense and secondly what is the size of the plates, are they big plates or smaller side plates. – Javad Hosseini Aug 21 '19 at 7:31
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Very approximately, a dinner fork is 20cm, a regular dinner plate is 28cm.

The fork when laid on the plate should just lap into the 'border' area, rim/lip [the raised outer ring that you don't put food on.

That makes the plates in your pictures smaller than regular dinner plates or soup plates [26cm], but larger than side plates [20cm]. As they don't have a traditional rim/lip but curve up rapidly at the edges, I'd say they're about 22cm. The fork would just sit inside without any overlap.

Personally I think they make the food look crowded, especially the top one. The bottom one feels like the plate is too deep for the food, the lighting makes it look sunken. For both I'd have just thinned things out towards the edges a bit & tried to lower the shadowing.

There are arguments for crowding the plate/bowl - noodles, for example which will always flow to fill the space, though here there is still a distinct margin & the highlights, broccoli, peas, etc strategically placed

https://500px.com/photo/291415211/Noodles-stir-fry-with-vegetables-by-Vladislav-Nosick?ctx_page=11&from=gallery&galleryPath=21002029&user_id=10743317

but there are arguments against - allowing the grains to thin out to the edges in this more homogenous meal

https://500px.com/photo/272902675/Couscous-salad-Tabbouleh-with-pomegranate-seeds-by-Vladislav-Nosick?ctx_page=16&from=gallery&galleryPath=21002029&user_id=10743317

or more noodles - this one beautifully spaced

https://500px.com/photo/1001491999/Japanese-Ramen-Noodle-Soup-With-Chicken-by-Vladislav-Nosick?ctx_page=1&from=popular

This one, conversely, doesn't work at all for me; crowded, messy with food overhanging the edge, clumped, unappetising, blurry, (I could go on ;)...

https://500px.com/photo/124225089/Mushrooms-with-noodles-and-sauce-by-Christian-Fischer?ctx_page=2&from=search&ctx_type=photos&ctx_q=noodles

Regarding the OP's comment -
"The objective of the shoot I'm creating is to have the plate inside the scene so it shouldn't be cropped which has led me to the conclusion that the bigger the plate, the smaller the food inside the plate will seem to the eye. In the photos I have attached in the original question, the food inside the plate seems larger than what I've been able to achieve in my own shooting..."

I wouldn't use the photos you posted as a definitive guide. They are completely crowded. Not just the servings themselves, but they seem desperate to get as much in close-frame as possible, very much at a cost to how appetising it all looks.

They look like they're selling you a café lunch, not a fine dining experience.

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  • On the last paragraph — there's nothing wrong with a delicious cafe lunch! – Please Read My Profile Aug 21 '19 at 14:56
  • @mattdm - of course not - but google image 'cafe lunch' & see how they try not to make it look quite so "ten minutes & I'll be cleaning the table whether you've finished or not" ;) – Tetsujin Aug 21 '19 at 15:00

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